Homestead Barn Hop #181

barnhopimage

“Cultivating the Homestead Community”

It’s just been one of those weeks– you guys can relate, right? I had multiple canning projects, gardening, and cleaning tasks on my to-do list this week, and pretty much none of them happened… I’m learning to be flexible–sometimes with gritted teeth–but still… ;) Here’s hoping next week will allow for a few more things to get crossed off the list!

Now, on to the Barn Hop!

This hop is hosted by The Prairie Homestead, New Life on a Homestead and The Elliott Homestead.

Did you share any homesteading related posts on your blog this week? If so, we’d love to have you link up below! Even if you don’t have a blog, we always welcome your comments!

Some Simple Guidelines:

1. Please remember that the Homestead Barn Hop is meant to be a place to share homesteading related encouragement and inspiring ideas specifically related to homesteading. In an effort to keep our weekly round-up clutter free, links which are not specifically homestead related, and any promotions such as giveaways, contests, carnivals, etc, will be deleted in order to maintain the integrity of the Barn Hop.

2. Please remember this is a family-friendly link up. Any pictures or posts linked to the hop which aren’t appropriate for our children to view or read will also be deleted immediately. We’re pretty conservative, so we ask that you use good judgment and err on the side of caution.

3. Make sure that you link to your Barn Hop post, not your blog’s main page, so your guests won’t have any trouble finding your great tips.

4. Please link back to the Homestead Barn Hop in the post that you share. Feel free to grab the banner at the top of this post to link back to us with.

5. 

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How to Make Herbal Steams for Colds and Congestion

How to make an herbal steam (3 ways!) for respiratory support during cold and flu season

By contributing writer Stacy K. of A Delightful Home

We’ve all been there…

Stuffed up nose, jam-packed sinuses, honking and snorting when you try to breathe freely…

The congestion and sinus pressure that accompany a cold or flu can be miserable!

Although relieving these issues naturally is often challenging, an herbal steam is one way to alleviate congestion without reaching into the medicine cabinet. I find the steam is comforting as well; which is a nice bonus when you are feeling ill.

Herbal steams can be prepared in a variety of ways, and you can use fresh or dried herbs as well as essential oils.

Usually, herbs or essential oils are added to hot water and the steam inhaled. This seems to be the most effective method, however, it is possible to create an herbal steam in the shower. A diffuser also works, but not as quickly.

Herbal steams need not be restricted to just a few herbs, as a wide variety of herbs work well to aid in clearing congestion.

I will begin by describing the three methods and then share a number of recipes.

3 Ways to Create an Herbal Steam

The Bowl Method

It doesn’t get much simpler than this. All you need to do is place fresh or dried herbs in a heat proof bowl, then pour hot water over the top.

If you’re using essential oils, pour the water in the bowl first, then add the essential oils.

In general you will need about one handful of dried herbs or two handfuls of fresh herbs to one pint of hot water. (This does not need to be exact.) If using essential oils, you will only need 2 or 3 drops.

eucalyptus chamomile steam

Water should be distilled or purified since any impurities or chemicals in water will be inhaled in the steam.… [Continue Reading]

How to Can Pumpkin

How to can pumpkin-- it's possible! You can the cubes and then mash when you are needing puree. Easy peasy.

I don’t claim to have much of a green thumb…

But I can grow a mean patch of pumpkins.

Okay… Okay. Pumpkins are pretty easy to grow, so don’t be too impressed…But still… I’m going to take full advantage of my bragging rights.

This year I poked a handful of heirloom pumpkin seeds into my hugelkultur bed, just to see what would happen. (If you’re wondering “hugel-whaaaa??” then read this post). Last year, my maiden voyage as a hugelkultur gardener was a complete and total flop. But being the stubborn homesteader that I am, I decided to give it another try–after applying a generous amount old manure, of course. (Because manure fixes everything).

how to can pumpkin

Apparently, the seeds loved the whole hugulkultur-thang, and they thrived. I ended up with around a dozen happy pumpkins from just a small corner of my garden.

I saved a couple of the littlest pumpkins to adorn my dining room table (because they are so cuuuuuuuute) and set to work preserving the rest. In years past, I’ve baked my pumpkins (using my finger-saving, no fuss method),  blended them, and crammed the puree into gallon-sized freezer bags. But honestly? I was dreading the process this year…

I don’t like the whole freeze-the-pumpkin-in-a-baggie method because:

a) It’s messy to put in the pumpkin puree into the bag, and wastes a lot of pumpkin when you are trying to remove it.

b) It takes up valuable freezer space.

c) I am the WORST about remembering to thaw stuff before I need it, so having jars ready at a moment’s notice makes me super-duper happy. (This is the same reason I can my beef broth instead of freezing it...)

Therefore, you can imagine my homesteader-delight when I realize you can indeed can pumpkin. There are just a few rules you need to follow first:

How to can pumpkin-- it's possible! You can the cubes and then mash when you are needing puree. Easy peasy.

 The Rules of Canning Pumpkin

1) If you are going to can pumpkin, you must, must, must use a pressure canner--no exceptions.… [Continue Reading]

Homestead Barn Hop #180

barnhopimage

“Cultivating the Homestead Community”

I feel at peace… We have chickens once again, thanks to a local friend. It’s been awfully quiet around the barnyard after the Great Chicken Massacre several weeks ago… I didn’t realized how accustomed I was to have them constantly milling around the yard. Thankfully, things feel back in balance, and I finally have something to eat my table scraps! (The turkey didn’t care for them, and it was driving me crazy!) ;)

Now, on to the Barn Hop!

This hop is hosted by The Prairie Homestead, New Life on a Homestead and The Elliott Homestead.

Did you share any homesteading related posts on your blog this week? If so, we’d love to have you link up below! Even if you don’t have a blog, we always welcome your comments!

Some Simple Guidelines:

1. Please remember that the Homestead Barn Hop is meant to be a place to share homesteading related encouragement and inspiring ideas specifically related to homesteading. In an effort to keep our weekly round-up clutter free, links which are not specifically homestead related, and any promotions such as giveaways, contests, carnivals, etc, will be deleted in order to maintain the integrity of the Barn Hop.

2. Please remember this is a family-friendly link up. Any pictures or posts linked to the hop which aren’t appropriate for our children to view or read will also be deleted immediately. We’re pretty conservative, so we ask that you use good judgment and err on the side of caution.

3. Make sure that you link to your Barn Hop post, not your blog’s main page, so your guests won’t have any trouble finding your great tips.

4. Please link back to the Homestead Barn Hop in the post that you share. Feel free to grab the banner at the top of this post to link back to us with.

[Continue Reading]