How to Make Sauerkraut

How to make sauerkraut

There are some parts of homesteading that seem almost magical.

Like when watch the cream you skimmed from yesterday’s milk suddenly turn into golden butter

Or when you are able to make vinegar appear from mere fruit peels.

Or when you pack a bunch of cabbage into a jar and it turns into perfectly tangy sauerkraut a week later.

Speaking of that, I can’t believe I’ve been afraid to learn how to make sauerkraut until now…

I’ve never been a huge fan of storebought sauerkraut… I mean, I tolerated it in some recipes, but didn’t exactly crave it. I had a bit of an underlying fear that my homemade versions would turn into a mutated-cabbage science experiment, so I always pushed it to the bottom of my “to-try” list.

Man oh man, was I ever missing out!

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Since I popped the top of my first jar of homemade kraut several months ago, I’ve been pretty much obsessed with it. I’ve literally started craving it, and found myself sneaking bowlfuls here and there throughout the day. Even four-year old Prairie Girl developed an affinity for it, and she actually had a full melt-down one day at lunch when I announced we were out.

Considering the probiotic prowess of kraut, I have a hunch our bodies are trying to tell us something. And I’m happy to oblige!

Keep in mind that in order to reap the health benefits and amazing probiotics of sauerkraut, it needs to be raw. Unfortunately, the canned, cooked, storebought varies will not have the same benefits, since heat destroys most of the beneficial bacteria and enzymes.

(this post contains affiliate links)

How to Make Sauerkraut

  • 1 head green cabbage*
  • 1.5 tablespoons sea salt (where to buy)
  • Clean glass jar (I usually use one average head of cabbage per quart-sized mason jar)

*I’m writing this recipe for one head of cabbage, BUT, keep in mind it takes nearly the same amount of effort to make a lot of kraut as it does a little… So don’t be afraid to make a BIG batch. And it tastes better the longer it ages, too!

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Wash the cabbage and remove any wilted outer leaves.

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Quarter the cabbage, remove the core, and slice the cabbage into thin strips (I shoot for around 1/4″ wide). Try to make the strips as uniform as possible, but don’t feel like they have to be perfect.

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Place the strips in a large bowl, and sprinkle the sea salt over the top.

Allow it to sit for 15 minutes or so, and then start mashing. There isn’t a right or wrong way to do this– just use your hands, a mallet, or whatever blunt object you can find to mash/knead/twist/press/crush the cabbage. The goal is to start the juices flowing. (It helps if you can think of something that makes you mad while you do this–it’s better than therapy, really…)

How to make homemade sauerkraut
Starting to release the juice

I mash/knead for about 8-10 minutes. Hopefully by the end of this process, you’ll have a lovely pool of salty cabbage juice sitting in the bottom of your bowl.

Place a couple handfuls of cabbage into the jar, then thoroughly pack down with a wooden spoon. The goal is to eliminate as many air bubbles as possible.

How to make homemade sauerkraut
Pack it down baby…

Repeat the packing and mashing until the jar is full– just make sure to leave about 2″ at the top.

If there is enough liquid flowing from your cabbage to cover it completely, congrats!

If not, make a 2% brine solution to fill up the rest of the jar. (If you don’t completely submerse the cabbage in liquid, it’s susceptible to mold and other gunk).

To Make a 2% Brine:

Dissolve 1 tablespoon fine sea salt in 4 cups non-chlorinated water. If you don’t use all of the brine for this recipe, it will keep indefinitely in the fridge.

The finer the salt, the less stirring you must to do to dissolve. I particularly like the ultra-fine salt from Fermentools.com, as it dissolves almost immediately.

Cover the exposed cabbage with brine, leaving 1″ of headspace at the top. If you are having troubles with the cabbage floating to the top, you can weigh it down with a glass weight, OR even wedge a piece of the cabbage core on top to hold it down. Any cabbage that is exposed will need to be thrown away, but you were going to toss the core anyway, so it’s no big loss.

How to make homemade sauerkraut
Adding a glass weight to hold the cabbage under the brine

Affix a lid to the jar (fingertight only), and set aside in a room-temperature location, out of direct sunlight, for at least one week.

You’ll probably want to place a small dish or tray under the jar, as they have the tendency to leak a bit and spill over. Also, removing the lid after a day or so to “burp” the jar and release any pent-up gasses is also a smart idea.

Taste and smell your kraut after one week. If it’s tangy enough, move to the refrigerator for storage. If you like a bit more tang, simply allow to ferment for a bit longer.

Should I Use an Air Lock Fermentation System?

For my first few batches of kraut, I simply used a regular mason jar and lid. However, I was excited when Fermentools sent me a 6-pack starter kit to try. Are air locks an absolute requirement for making homemade fermented vegetables? Nope. However, they can reduce the amount of mold on a ferment, and allow the gasses to escape without you having to “burp” the jar. Basically, if you’re new to fermenting, an airlock makes the whole process pretty much fool-proof.

How to make homemade sauerkraut
Using an air lock from Fermentools

The air locks were simple to use with the widemouth mason jars I had on hand, and the glass weights that came in the set were especially handy for keeping the cabbage from floating to the top (and a little easier than trying to wedge a core down in there…)

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Bottom line– you don’t *have* to use a air lock, but they are pretty handy, and often produce a higher quality product in the end. And if you’re making a big batch of homemade sauerkraut, half-gallon mason jars a easier to handle (and less expensive) than one of those big ol’ fermenting crocks. (I got one of the 6-packs, which will handle around three gallons of kraut…)

How to make homemade sauerkraut

Kitchen Notes

  • There are lots of ways to flavor your kraut, such as caraway seeds, juniper berries, dill seeds, or celery seeds. However, I’ve been happy with just the plain version.
  • If there is exposed kraut at the top of the jar, it will turn brown, or a scum can develop. Just scrape it off and you’ll be good to go. Even a little mold is OK, as long as it hasn’t contaminated the entire batch. Remember, lacto-fermented foods have a host of friendly bacteria keeping them safe. However, if at any point your sauerkraut smells rancid or nasty, and beyond the point of that pleasantly sour tang, toss it.
  • Although I used a swingtop jar in my photos (because it’s cute), I used a regular mason jar for the fermentation process.
  • Avoid iodized salt in this recipe, and stick to high quality sea salt instead, like this one.
  • If you’re wanting a good beginner’s kit of fermenting tools, I recommend Fermentools.com

How to make homemade sauerkraut

 

5.0 from 2 reviews
How to Make Sauerkraut
Author: 
Recipe type: Fermented Foods
Cuisine: German
 
Ingredients
  • 1 head green cabbage*
  • 1.5 tablespoons sea salt
  • Clean glass jar (I usually use one average head of cabbage per quart-sized mason jar)
  • *I'm writing this recipe for one head of cabbage, BUT, keep in mind it takes nearly the same amount of effort to make a lot of kraut as it does a little... So don't be afraid to make a BIG batch.
Instructions
  1. Wash the cabbage and remove any wilted outer leaves.
  2. Quarter the cabbage, remove the core, and slice the cabbage into thin strips (I shoot for around ¼" wide). Try to make the strips as uniform as possible, but don't feel like they have to be perfect.
  3. Place the strips in a large bowl, and sprinkle the sea salt over the top.
  4. Allow it to sit for 15 minutes or so, and then start mashing. There isn't a right or wrong way to do this-- just use your hands, a mallet, or whatever blunt object you can find to mash/knead/twist/press/crush the cabbage. The goal is to start the juices flowing. (It helps if you can think of something that makes you mad while you do this--it's better than therapy, really...)
  5. I mash/knead for about 8-10 minutes. Hopefully by the end of this process, you'll have a lovely pool of salty cabbage juice sitting in the bottom of your bowl.
  6. Place a couple handfuls of cabbage into the jar, then thoroughly pack down with a wooden spoon. The goal is to eliminate as many air bubbles as possible.
  7. Repeat the packing and mashing until the jar is full-- just make sure to leave about 2" at the top.
  8. If you there is enough liquid flowing from your cabbage to cover it completely, congrats!
  9. If not, make a 2% brine solution to fill up the rest of the jar. (If you don't completely submerse the cabbage in liquid, it's susceptible to mold and other gunk).
  10. To Make a 2% Brine:
  11. Dissolve 1 tablespoon fine sea salt in 4 cups non-chlorinated water. If you don't use all of the brine for this recipe, it will keep indefinitely in the fridge.
  12. Cover the exposed cabbage with brine, leaving 1" of headspace at the top. If you are having troubles with the cabbage floating to the top, you can weigh it down with a glass weight, OR even wedge a piece of the cabbage core on top to hold it down. Any cabbage that is exposed will need to be thrown away, but you were going to toss the core anyway, so it's no big loss.
  13. Affix a lid to the jar (fingertight only), and set aside in a room-temperature location, out of direct sunlight, for at least one week.
  14. You'll probably want to place a small dish or tray under the jar, as they have the tendency to leak a bit and spill over. Also, removing the lid after a day or so to "burp" the jar and release any pent-up gasses is also a smart idea.
  15. Taste and smell your kraut after one week. If it's tangy enough, move to the refrigerator for storage. If you like a bit more tang, simply allow to ferment for a bit longer.

 

This post is happily sponsored by Fermentools.com, because I love being able to share quality homestead tools with my readers, especially when they make our homestead lives just a little bit easier!

Basic Homemade Pasta Recipe

homemade pasta recipe

Rocket science has no place in my kitchen.

As much as I love to cook, I sometimes run across certain tutorials/techniques that make my no-fuss brain want to explode.

Take fresh pasta for example.

Many of the “basic” fresh pasta recipes you find floating around Google make homemade pasta seem all but attainable with their complicated formulas, detailed instructions, and mind-numbing array of ingredient options.

No thanks.

But today I’m here to let you in on a little secret the homemade-pasta-gods probably don’t want you to know:

It’s entirely possible to make very delicious, perfectly textured, from-scratch pasta without the fuss. And only three ingredients. You’re welcome.

homemade fresh pasta recipe

Homemade Pasta Recipe

Yield: approximately one pound

  • 2 cups flour (see note below)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 large eggs

Combine the flour and salt.

homemade pasta recipe

Make a well in the center of the flour, and add the eggs.

Gently begin to mix the eggs, gradually drawing in flour with each stroke. Eventually a stiff dough will form.

Knead the pasta dough for 8-10 minutes.

If the dough is too dry and won’t stick together, add a 1/2 teaspoon of water. If it is too sticky, sprinkle in a bit more flour.

Keep in mind this dough will be much stiffer than traditional bread doughs. However, the longer you work it, the smoother and more pliable it will become.

homemade pasta recipe
You’re looking for a smooth texture. If your dough is still rough, keep kneading.

We are looking for a smooth, satiny consistency, which will develop the longer you knead.

Cover the well-kneaded dough tightly with plastic wrap, and allow it to rest for around 45 minutes. (This resting phase is super important, as it gives the dough time to relax. Otherwise, you’ll fight it the whole time you are rolling it out.)

homemade pasta recipe

After the resting period, divide the dough into four portions and roll into a small, flat circle. Now comes the cool part!

How to Use a Pasta Machine

I’m really picky with my kitchen gadgets, and generally only keep the necessities. However, I’m very loyal to my pasta machine (affiliate link) and it has earned its place in my crowded cupboards.

homemade pasta recipe
Ready to roll

Rolling the dough is a process– you need to make several passes, throughout each thickness setting for the best results. I start with the biggest setting (usually 5 or 6), run it through once or twice there, then gradually adjust the settings to be thinner and thinner until I have the perfect sheet of golden pasta.

homemade pasta recipe
Folding into thirds before the next pass through the roller

 

Between each pass, I fold the strip into thirds. This helps square up the edges and keeps things even. Then simply roll it through the cutting side of the machine to slice into spaghetti or fettuccine.

homemade pasta recipe

Rolling Pin Instructions:

If you don’t have a pasta machine, you can use a rolling pin and knife (or pizza cutter) instead. Keep in mind you’ll want to roll it out as thin as humanly possible, as it will plump up considerably once you cook it.

Roll each portion of dough out on a well-flour surface and then cut into thin strips. Your noodles will be more rustic, but they’ll still taste amazing.

From here, you can either cook your pasta right away (3-4 minutes in boiling water) or dry it for later.

fresh homemade pasta recipe

It also freezes well– just make sure you don’t throw it into the freezer in a big lump, because then you’ll end up with a pasta dumpling when you go to cook it.

Serve your perfect homemade pasta with homemade sauce, or olive oil, Parmesan, and fresh herbs.

homemade pasta recipe

Kitchen Notes:

  • There are a variety of opinions when it comes to flour for making homemade pasta, and some people get all fancy with specialty flours (traditionally, pasta is made with semolina flour). However, I’ve had wonderful results just using regular unbleached all-purpose flour. If you like, you can use a mix of whole wheat flour, combined with the all-purpose. Keep in mind the more whole wheat you use, the more the consistency of the finished noodles will change.
  • If at any point, your fresh pasta is wanting to stick to the surface, the machine, your rolling pin, or other pieces of pasta, add more flour. I’m usually very generous with my flour-sprinkling. Otherwise, you’ll end up with a sticky blob.
  • I’ve not tried this recipe with gluten-free flours, sorry!
  • You can easily make flavored fresh pastas by adding fresh or dried herbs to the dough, or spice it up with garlic or onion powder.

homemade pasta recipe

5.0 from 2 reviews
Basic Homemade Pasta Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1 lb pasta
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 large eggs
Instructions
  1. Combine the flour and salt.
  2. Make a well in the center of the flour, and add the eggs.
  3. Gently begin to mix the eggs, gradually drawing in flour with each stroke. Eventually a stiff dough will form.
  4. Knead the pasta dough for 8-10 minutes.
  5. If the dough is too dry and won't stick together, add a ½ teaspoon of water. If it is too sticky, sprinkle in a bit more flour.
  6. Keep in mind this dough will be much stiffer than your traditional bread doughs. However, the longer you work it, the smoother and more pliable it will become.
  7. We are looking for a smooth, satiny consistency, which will begin to develop the more you knead.
  8. Cover the well-kneaded dough tightly with plastic wrap, and allow it to rest for around 45 minutes. (This resting phase is super important, as it gives the dough time to relax. Otherwise, you'll fight it the whole time you are rolling it out.)
  9. After the resting period, divide the dough into four portions. Now comes the cool part!
  10. Pasta Machine Instructions:
  11. I'm really picky with my kitchen gadgets, and generally only keep the necessities. However, I'm very loyal to my pasta machine and it has earned it's place in my crowded cupboards.
  12. Rolling the dough is a process-- you need to make several passes, throughout each thickness setting for the best results. I start with the biggest setting (usually 5 or 6), run it through once or twice there, and then start gradually adjust the settings to be thinner and thinner until I have the perfect sheet of golden pasta.
  13. Between each pass, I like to fold the strip into thirds. This helps square up the edges and keeps things even. Then simply roll it through the cutting side of the machine to slice into spaghetti or fettucine.
  14. Rolling Pin Instructions:
  15. If you don't have a pasta machine, you can simply use a rolling pin and knife (or pizza cutter). Keep in mind you'll want to roll it out as thin as humanly possible, as it will plumb up considerably once you cook it.
  16. Roll each portion of dough out on a well-flour surface and then cut into thin strips. Your noodles will be more rustic, but they'll still taste amazing.
  17. From here, you can either cook your pasta right away (3-4 minutes in boiling water) or dry it.
  18. It also freezes well-- just make sure you don't throw it into the freezer in a big lump, because then you'll end up with a pasta dumpling when you go to cook it.
  19. Serve your perfect homemade pasta with homemade sauces, or olive oil, Parmesan, and fresh herbs.
Notes
Kitchen Notes:

There are a variety of opinions when it comes to pasta flour... Some people get all fancy with specialty flours (traditionally, pasta is made with semolina flour). However, I've had wonderful results just using regular unbleached all-purpose flour. If you like you can use a mix of whole wheat flour, combined with the all-purpose. Just keep in mind the more whole wheat you use, the more the consistency of the finished noodles will change.
I've not tried this recipe with gluten-free flours, sorry!
You can easily make flavored pastas by adding fresh or dried herbs to the dough, or spice it up with garlic or onion powder.

 

Double Chocolate Cream Pie Recipe (GF, DF)

gluten free chocolate pie recipe with chocolate crust

A little black dress, a string of pearls, and a romantic candlelit supper…

While those might be the elements that comprise the typical Valentine’s Day celebration, our homestead Valentine’s Days look slightly different.

OK, a lot different.

I don’t even own a little black dress, let alone a string of pearls (I’m more of a chunky rustic jewelry sort of gal…), and any candles I have are of the homemade beef-tallow-in-mason-jar-variety

Considering how hard it is to find a babysitter  where we live, we usually just celebrate our Valentine’s Day at home. With the kids. After barn chores.

It might not be the standard American definition of romance, but it works for us.

That being said, I DO like to make a fancy supper for nights like this, with tender grassfed steaks, crispy baked potatoes, and buttered green beans being our standard fare.

And there’s gotta be something chocolate for dessert. Like this utterly amazing gluten free chocolate cream pie recipe… I’m not gonna tell you how many times I’ve made this in the last month… All in the name of writing a good blog post… Right?

While we aren’t gluten-free at our house, and we most certainly enjoy our dairy products, I know many of you are on gluten-free or dairy-free diets. This pie fulfills both of those requirements, AND doesn’t use a lick of refined sugar. But the best part? You’ll never know it in a millions years. On to the recipe!

(this post contains affiliate links)

gluten free chocolate pie recipe with chocolate crust

Gluten Free Chocolate Cream Pie Recipe

(Grain-Free, Dairy-Free)

Reprinted with permission from Everyday Grain-Free Baking 

Chocolate Piecrust Ingredients:

Chocolate Cream Filling Ingredients:

  • 2 3/4 cups pure canned coconut milk (where to buy)
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons unflavored grass-fed gelatin
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract (how to make vanilla extract)
  • 2/3 cups dairy-free mini chocolate chips (where to buy)
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt

Optional: Homemade Whipped Cream or Whipped Coconut Cream or for topping

Prepare the Chocolate Piecrust:

In a food processor, combine the almond flour, cocoa powder, coconut flour, gelatin and salt. Pulse in the palm shortening. Then add the honey and pulse until a dough ball forms.

Carefully remove the dough and shape it into a disk. Wrap in plastic and place it in the fridge to chill for 20-30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 325°F. Lightly oil a 9-inch deep-dish pie dish. Once dough is chilled, remove it from the fridge and press the dough evenly along the bottom and sides of the pie dish to form the piecrust. Poke the bottom of the crust with a fork.

Bake 12-14 minutes until crust is golden brown. Carefully remove it from the oven and allow the crust to cool completely.

Prepare the Chocolate Cream Filling: In a medium saucepan, add the coconut milk and sprinkle the gelatin on the top of the milk. Allow the gelatin to bloom about 5-10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, honey and vanilla. Set aside.

Once gelatin has softened, place saucepan over medium heat. Whisk constantly until the milk and gelatin are well combined and the milk is warmed. Then slowly add 1/2 cup of the warm milk to the yolks, whisking constantly to combine. Slowly pour the yolk mixture into the saucepan and whisk thoroughly.

Add the chocolate chips, cocoa powder and salt, and whisk well to combine. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and whisk for 2-3 minutes until mixture thickens. Then pour the custard through a fine mesh strainer into a shallow dish to cool.

Once cooled, pour the chocolate filling into the cooled pie Place in the refrigerator to set at least 6-8 hours or overnight. When ready to serve, top with homemade whipped cream or Whipped Coconut Cream and chocolate shavings, if desired. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 12 hours.

gluten free chocolate pie recipe with chocolate crust

Kitchen Notes:

  • I didn’t have any palm shortening, so I used coconut oil instead and it worked just fine. (where to buy coconut oil)
  • If you’d like to use regular whole milk in place of the coconut milk, you can. The finished result won’t be quite as firm, but it’ll still be delicious.
  •  If you don’t have a deep-dish pie pan, simply pour excess chocolate cream filling into a bowl and refrigerate for a delicious pudding treat. And then don’t tell the kids what you did, so you can eat it all yourself. Not that I would do that, or anything…

Hunting for More Grain-Free Baking Recipes?

grain free baking recipesI’ve been having a blast making some of the recipes from my friend Kelly’s fabulous new cookbook, Everyday Grain-Free Baking. I’ve followed Kelly’s blog, The Nourishing Home, for years now, and she is well-known for her fool-proof recipes and drop-dead gorgeous photography. (I’ve caught myself sitting there staring at the photos in Everyday Grain-Free Baking more than once. They’ll make you want to lick the page.)

Even though my family isn’t gluten-free, we’ve been scarfing up these recipes anyway– you’d never know they were missing gluten and refined sugar.

There are over 100 tried-and-true recipes for favorites such as:

  • Easy Everyday Breadgrain free baking recipes
  • Strawberry Shortcake Biscuits
  • Peach Pie in a Jar
  • Lemonade Sunshine Cake
  • Boston Cream Pie
  • Snickerdoodles
  • Fudgy Brownies
  • Nut-Free Snack Bars

All of the recipes use basic ingredients (no xantham gum, tapioca starch, or anything like that…) and are completely gluten-free, starch free, refined sugar free, and dairy free.

Grab your copy of Everyday Grain-Free Baking HERE.

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Double Chocolate Cream Pie Recipe (GF, DF)
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 8 servings
 
Ingredients
  • Chocolate Piecrust
  • 1¾ cups blanched almond flour
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • ¼ teaspoon unflavored grass-fed gelatin
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 5 tablespoons palm shortening
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • Chocolate Cream Filling
  • 2¾ cups pure canned coconut milk
  • 2¼ teaspoons unflavored grass-fed gelatin
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ⅓ cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • ⅔ cups dairy-free mini chocolate chips
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • ⅛ teaspoon sea salt
  • Optional: Homemade Whipped Cream or Whipped Coconut Cream or for topping
Instructions
  1. Prepare the Chocolate Piecrust:
  2. In a food processor, combine the almond flour, cocoa powder, coconut flour, gelatin and salt. Pulse in the palm shortening. Then add the honey and pulse until a dough ball forms.
  3. Carefully remove the dough and shape it into a disk. Wrap in plastic and place it in the fridge to chill for 20-30 minutes.
  4. Preheat oven to 325°F. Lightly oil a 9-inch deep-dish pie dish. Once dough is chilled, remove it from the fridge and press the dough evenly along the bottom and sides of the pie dish to form the piecrust. Poke the bottom of the crust with a fork.
  5. Bake 12-14 minutes until crust is golden brown. Carefully remove it from the oven and allow the crust to cool completely.
  6. Prepare the Chocolate Cream Filling: In a medium saucepan, add the coconut milk and sprinkle the gelatin on the top of the milk. Allow the gelatin to bloom about 5-10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, honey and vanilla. Set aside.
  7. Once gelatin has softened, place saucepan over medium heat. Whisk constantly until the milk and gelatin are well combined and the milk is warmed. Then slowly add ½ cup of the warm milk to the yolks, whisking constantly to combine. Slowly pour the yolk mixture into the saucepan and whisk thoroughly.
  8. Add the chocolate chips, cocoa powder and salt, and whisk well to combine. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and whisk for 2-3 minutes until mixture thickens. Then pour the custard through a fine mesh strainer into a shallow dish to cool.
  9. Once cooled, pour the chocolate filling into the cooled pie Place in the refrigerator to set at least 6-8 hours or overnight. When ready to serve, top with fresh Whipped Coconut Cream and chocolate shavings, if desired. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 12 hours.

 

 

Healthy Cheeseburger Soup Recipe

from scratch cheeseburger soup with no processed ingredients!

You crunch through the snow…

…hiking your legs to your chest as you plod back to the house.

The copious layers of outerwear you’re sporting cause you to mildly resemble a marshmallow, yet you feel wind cutting through the fabric anyway.

Your fingers are stiff in your gloves from the frigid water that splashed up as you chopped ice and filled water tanks.

Not a moment too soon, you reach the front door and force your almost-numb fingers to clumsily grip the doorknob.

As you push the door open, your face is hit with a wall of warm air, and the most tantalizing scent fills your nose.

Rich, soul-warming broth and savory sauteed onions and garlic, all tumbled together in a mouth-watering, cheesy sauce with potatoes and ground beef.

Comfort food at its finest. And you made it yourself.

Most crockpot cheeseburger soup recipes call for a pile of processed ingredients, including frozen potatoes, processed cheese product, and MSG-laden canned soups.

But not this one.

Thankfully, it was pretty easy to make a few ingredient swaps. The result? A mouth-watering, from-scratch cheeseburger soup recipe you can make in your slow cooker that tastes better than the processed version. WIN!

(And yes, I posted two soup recipes in less than two weeks… My favorite French onion soup, and now this one. Can you find it in your heart to forgive me?) ;)

from scratch cheeseburger soup with no processed ingredients!

Slow Cooker Cheeseburger Soup Recipe

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 4 large potatoes, diced (and peeled, if you’d rather not eat the peels)
  • 1 cup carrots, diced
  • 4 cups chicken stock (how to make your own chicken stock)
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • Salt/pepper, to taste

In a large pot, brown the ground beef, onion, and garlic.

Sprinkle in the flour, cooking and stirring for 3-5 minutes to allow the flour to brown.

Add this mixture to the slow cooker, and then add the potatoes, carrots, parsley, and chicken stock.

Cook for 4-6 hours on low.

30 minutes before serving, stir in the milk and cheese. Allow it to warm through, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve immediately.

from scratch cheeseburger soup with no processed ingredients!

Kitchen Notes:

  • I love using our homegrown Yukon Gold potatoes in this recipe when I can. The skins are so thin and delicate, I never bother to peel them.
  • My husband says I shouldn’t call this “cheeseburger soup,” since you technically don’t have carrots on a real cheeseburger. However, it contains hamburger and cheese, so I’m keeping the name. ;)
  • The type of broth you use will make or break your soup– and of course, homemade broth is best!
  • You know I’m gonna tell you to serve this with homemade french bread, right?
  • I haven’t experimented making this recipe with non-dairy milks or gluten-free flours, sorry.

from scratch cheeseburger soup with no processed ingredients!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Slow Cooker Cheeseburger Soup
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • ⅓ cup flour
  • 4 large potatoes, diced
  • 1 cup carrots, diced
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • Salt/pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. In a large pot, brown the ground beef, onion, and garlic.
  2. Sprinkle in the flour, cooking and stirring for 3-5 minutes, so the flour has time to brown.
  3. Add this mixture to the slow cooker, and then add the potatoes, carrots, parsley, and chicken stock.
  4. Cook for 4-6 hours on low.
  5. minutes before serving, stir in the milk and cheese. Allow it to warm through, and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  6. Serve immediately. And leftovers taste even better the next day.

 Other Homestead Soup Recipes