The Prairie Homestead http://www.theprairiehomestead.com Homesteading | Self Sufficient Living | Living off the Land Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:00:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 10 Things Your Non-Homesteading Friends Just Don’t Understand http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/07/10-things-your-non-homesteading-friends-just-dont-understand.html http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/07/10-things-your-non-homesteading-friends-just-dont-understand.html#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:00:50 +0000 http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/?p=14553 Have you ever noticed kind of a gap? Sometimes it feels like there’s a bit of a disconnect between me and my non-homesteading friends. Ever been there? Thankfully, considering I’ve been chasing this homesteading dream for about 7 years now, most of my friends/family now understand that Jill is just weird. And they’re used to […]

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non-homesteading-friends-2

Have you ever noticed kind of a gap?

Sometimes it feels like there’s a bit of a disconnect between me and my non-homesteading friends. Ever been there?

Thankfully, considering I’ve been chasing this homesteading dream for about 7 years now, most of my friends/family now understand that Jill is just weird. And they’re used to it.

No one even raises their eyebrows anymore when we bring home a new farm animal or start building a new structure/fence/tractor/whatever.

So it’s all good.

But then there are those other times when I happily run to town in my muck boots, hair adorned with bits of hay, and manure-smudged jeans, and I see someone who doesn’t know me very well… And I suspect they think I’m a bit of an alien. Or just a slob. Or maybe a little bit of both.

Sometimes I wish I could just send them a post like this before we get to know each other, so they have a better understanding of my crazy lifestyle. Because, ya know, us homesteader folk are kind of our own breed of weird.

10 Things Your Non-Homesteading Friends Just Don’t Understand

1. We’re rather proud of the dirt under our fingernails

The short, chipped, grimy nails adorning my battered, prematurely-wrinkled hands would be a laughingstock in some circles of women. But you know what?

deep mulch garden method

I love my hands. 

These hands can quickly squeeze gallons of milk from an udder, nurture growing vegetables, convince a stubborn heifer to load in the trailer, build fence, hold the reins of my favorite horse, and knead the best bread you’ve ever put in your mouth.

I’m so used to my plain, grubby fingernails, whenever I do try to paint them, the flashes of color startle me all day long because I’m not used to it. And then I end up nervously picking all the polish off… So yeah, it’s safe to say this girl is perfectly happy without a manicure.

 2. We really, truly like having a lot of projects going at once.

Oh honey… You’re so busy…” They say it with a look of pity in their eyes.

I’ve really started to dislike the term “busy”, because I think it carries a such a negative connotation, and people have drastically different definitions of what busy really is…

I prefer my schedule to be “pleasantly full,” and I keep it that way on purpose. I am not a victim of my homesteading schedule. (And if you’re wondering how I get (most) things done, here are my best homestead time management tips)

Those days where I milk the cow, then make bread, then write a blog post, then help hubby with a fencing project, then jump on a quick phone call, then experiment with a new DIY recipe, then do a bit of garden work, then linger outside at dusk while doing evening chores, then check email before rolling into bed?

Those are are my favorite days. I love every bit of them.

If I ever get to the point where I feel the need to stroll the mall to fill my hours, please put me out of my misery. 😉

3. Food you grow yourself really does taste better.

No doubt about it, a vegetable picked 30 steps from your front door will always, always have better flavor than a veggie that’s been shipped half-way around the country.

radish

Once you have the experience of looking down at your plate and knowing where each and every component came from, you’ll be hooked. It’s the best seasoning there is.

4. We don’t do what we do to make anyone else feel inferior.

Comparison is rampant in our culture. Some people blame the prevalence of social media, but I think it’s a problem as old as time. Every once in a while, I get the vibe that someone suspects I’m attempting to be a Super Mom with all my homesteading efforts. Let me just say this: I am as far from Super Mom as a person can get.

Like anyone else, we homesteading-folk prioritize what is important to us. So while you might think we are Super Human as we milk our cow, grow our own salads (AND make the dressing…), and whip up batches of homemade mozzarella, know this is simply where we’ve chosen to spend our time.

Case in point? While I may have a few homesteading skills, I am horrifically awful at doing laundry, my children have boring birthday parties, and I don’t sew or knit. See? No Super Mom here.

We’re just doing what makes us happy, and we aren’t trying to make anyone who isn’t into our lifestyle feel poorly about themselves. We’ll still be your friend, and you don’t even have to can your own applesauce.

5. Getting the first egg from your first chicken is a thrill like no other.

Or when the first tomato appears on the plant. Or you put your first packages of home-raised meat into the freezer.

eggs-home

Growing your own food is one of the most satisfying things I’ve ever done, and the first time experiencing the fruits of your labor is magical. It makes all the tough times, hard work, and disappointments worth it.

So, to all the non-homesteaders out there, please bear with us while we gush about our eggs and tomatoes. We’ll stop… eventually. Maybe.

6. We know it’s easier and faster to buy _____ at the store. But we still want to make it ourselves.

If there is one thing to know modern homesteaders, it’s that we hardly ever choose the “easy” route.

This homesteading-gig is empowering. And fulfilling. And an adventure. But easy? Definitely not.

But for some reason, that doesn’t bother us. We’re just weird like that.

7. We’re not trying to reenact Little House on the Prairie

I’ve received some criticism because some of my recipes or tutorials use purchased ingredients. (For example: my homemade crockpot soap recipe uses store-bought lye instead of lye made from wood ashes.)

My response?

You’re missing the point.

The way I see it, modern homesteading is all about mixing the best of the old with the best of the new.

To be perfectly honest? I don’t want to take a bath in a small tub while someone pours hot water over my head. I rather like my shower, thankyouverymuch.

homemade hot process soap recipe

I also very much appreciate my dishwasher and washing machine. Can I live without those things? Yup. Do I think it’s wise to be prepared in case there is ever an event that takes down the grid? Sure!

But in the meantime, I’m thankful to have electricity in my homesteading efforts.

The old-fashioned homesteading lifestyle is one we heavily romanticize. And while there are definitely romantic parts to it, I’m careful to recognize that our homesteading ancestors lived the way they did out of necessity, and simple survival consumed a huge part of their day.

And yes, if Ma Ingalls could have had a washing machine, I’m willing to bet she would have loved it.

8. We actually like living a bazillion miles away from town.

I always giggle when I read the headlines of the listings in the local real estate magazines…

“Only 10 minutes from downtown!”

“Only 5 minutes away from Wal-Mart!”

Um, if you’re trying to convince me to buy a house, that’s not the way to do it.

Quick Side Note: if you *do* live in town, know that it’s still very possible to still homestead. You absolutely can live 5 minutes from Wal-Mart and still have a blossoming garden or even chickens. I’m a firm believer in that!

But for those of us who do live far from the grocery store, know that we prefer it that way, so you don’t have to feel sorry for us.

tour19

I sure can’t order in pizza, or swing by the store when I’m missing an ingredient for a recipe, but I’m cool with that. The peace and quiet and wide open spaces make it worth it. (And as a result, I’ve learned how to make darn good pizza from scratch.)

I know living this far out isn’t for everyone, and some people really, truly want to be within walking distance of the grocery, but my 40 mile drive doesn’t bother me in the slightest.

9. Scooping poop is better than therapy.

Or any type of manual labor, actually. (I can mow the lawn really fast when I’m mad.)

non-homesteading-friends-1

When I’m feeling stressed or angry, I stomp down to the barn, grab my pitchfork, and get to work. The negative feelings melt away with each scoop I toss into the wheelbarrow.

Side-Note: When you’re a homesteader, poop isn’t gross– it’s beautiful. Poop turns into compost which magically nurtures the soil and your plants. Embrace the poop.

10. If we don’t answer our phone, we’re not ignoring you on purpose.

Especially during the summer.

Sometimes we get so absorbed in the latest project, our social life goes out the window. Not always, but sometimes… At least for me.

I’m pretty horrible about meeting friends in town for lunch or play dates… It’s not that I don’t want to see them, it’s just that my brain is usually preoccupied with my latest homesteading mission.

For the non-homesteaders reading this, if you want to see more of your homesteading friends, may I suggest offering to help them put up tomatoes? Or pick apples? Or butcher chickens? They’ll love the extra set of hands and companionship, and it’s rewarding to accomplish stuff as you catch up.

So… can you relate at all? Leave a comment? 

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Homemade Liquid Fence Recipe http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/homemade-liquid-fence-recipe.html http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/homemade-liquid-fence-recipe.html#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 12:00:45 +0000 http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/?p=14550 What do you say when your 5 year-old hands you a headless rabbit? Yeah, I was tongue-tied too. We were out working in the yard when I pointed out to Prairie Girl that her barn cat was carrying a freshly-caught bunny in its mouth. A split-second later, I heard “Here, Mommy” and turned around to see her […]

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homemade liquid fence recipe

What do you say when your 5 year-old hands you a headless rabbit?

Yeah, I was tongue-tied too.

We were out working in the yard when I pointed out to Prairie Girl that her barn cat was carrying a freshly-caught bunny in its mouth.

A split-second later, I heard “Here, Mommy” and turned around to see her holding a decapitated rabbit by it’s hind legs.

Followed by, “Hang on, I’ll get the head too…

I stuttered for a minute before quickly explaining the rabbit was beyond the point of saving. Prairie Girl begrudgingly returned the bunny to the annoyed cat, and I couldn’t help but smile at the thought of my blonde-headed little girl wrestling a headless rabbit from the mouth of a hungry kitty. She seems to have inherited her mama’s strong stomach.

But that brings us to the topic of rabbits.

We have a rabbit epidemic…

It wasn’t so bad when we had our two athletic dogs, but ever since they passed away, the bunny population has sky-rocketed. Our remaining dogs (an old, fat one, and a big, slow one) just aren’t cutting it, and although the barn cats will grab one here and there, they still aren’t making a dent.

Truthfully, the rabbits wouldn’t bother me much if they would just stay away from my vegetables. We have a fence around the garden (hog panels plus chicken wire at the bottom), but I think they are still squeezing in somewhere.

And they have done a very thorough job of eating every.single.one of my cucumber plants down to the nubs.

I’m not impressed.

Because I want pickles.

I’ve been doing a lot of research lately on rabbit repelling sprays, and versions of this liquid fence recipe get rave reviews. The key is to make it stinky… Very, very stinky.

So I mixed up a BIG batch and have been spraying it religiously.

Some folks say it works for deer too, but since we don’t have deer problems in our garden, I can’t vouch for that.

homemade liquid fence recipe

Homemade Liquid Fence® Recipe

Crack the eggs and combine them with the garlic and water in a bucket (use an old bucket you don’t mind getting icky).

Cover the mixture, and set it outside in the sun for 24-48 hours. Yup, that’s right. We want it to ferment and fester and get really, er… strong.

After it’s had time to get nice and smelly, strain out the garlic chunks, then mix in the soap and clove essential oil.

Place the mixture in a sprayer and spray generously around any area of your garden or yard that is being overtaken by rabbits.

I spray mine around the perimeter of my garden, in between the rows that are having the most problems (cucumbers!), and even on some of the plants.

Reapply after heavy rains or watering.

homemade liquid fence recipe

Notes:

  • WEAR GLOVES with you apply this stuff! It stinks like crazy and the garlic makes it hard to wash off your skin completely. It doesn’t burn or anything. It just stinks.
  • I use a garden sprayer for my liquid fence recipe. It makes the application process much easier, as compared to using a small spray bottle. Although, if a small sprayer is all you have, it’ll still work, your hand just might get tired.
  • As with any spray I might be using on my plants, I try to apply this in the evenings and avoid the heat of the day. Sometimes a spray, combined with the sun’s rays, can “burn” a plant’s leaves a bit. I haven’t had any problems thus far, but just FYI.
  • You can totally cut this recipe in half if you want to make a smaller amount.
  • I let my sprayer sit a few days before cleaning it, and the egg residue clogged it up a bit. It’s best to use a full batch and then clean everything out between uses, if possible.
  • Have old eggs or even slightly rotten ones? This is a great way to get rid of them! The stinkier, the better…
  • If you don’t have clove essential oil, you can add 10-15 whole cloves to your liquid fence recipe and allow it to steep with the garlic before straining. Or, just omit the cloves altogether.

4.5 from 2 reviews
Homemade Liquid Fence Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: Garden DIY
 
Ingredients
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon dish soap
  • 10-20 drops clove essential oil -- optional
  • 1 gallon water
  • Pump sprayer
Instructions
  1. Crack the eggs and combine them with the garlic and water in a bucket (use an old bucket that you don't mind getting icky).
  2. Cover the mixture, and set it outside in the sun for 24-48 hours. Yup, that's right. We want it to ferment and fester and get really, er... strong.
  3. After it's had time to get nice and smelly, strain out the garlic chunks, then mix in the soap and clove essential oil.
  4. Place the mixture in a sprayer and spray generously around any area of your garden or yard that is being overtaken by rabbits.
  5. I spray mine around the perimeter of my garden, in between the rows that are having the most problems (cucumbers!), and even on some of the plants.
  6. Reapply after heavy rains or watering.

 

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Shredded Hash Browns Recipe http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/shredded-hash-browns-recipe.html http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/shredded-hash-browns-recipe.html#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 13:00:57 +0000 http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/?p=14471 I had a dream… …of being able to make shredded hash browns at home without them being completely gross. Because even my best-laid plans would leave me with poor results… Too soggy. Too gummy. Too raw. Too burnt. And hopelessly stuck to the pan. I can make homemade marshmallows and french bread from scratch, for […]

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homemade shredded hash browns recipe

I had a dream…

…of being able to make shredded hash browns at home without them being completely gross.

Because even my best-laid plans would leave me with poor results…

Too soggy. Too gummy. Too raw. Too burnt.

And hopelessly stuck to the pan.

I can make homemade marshmallows and french bread from scratch, for goodness sakes. What was up with these stinkin’ hash browns?

I am way too stubborn to buy frozen shredded hash browns from the store, so there we were, stuck eating fried potato cubes instead. Tragic.

Come to find out, there were only a few simple steps standing between me and homemade hash brown potato heaven. Who knew?

If you are in the same boat I was, you’ll want to definitely pin or save today’s post. It’s life-changing information, I’m telling ya.

homemade shredded hash browns recipe

Crispy Shredded Hash Browns Recipe

  • 2-3 potatoes (Any type will work, but Russets are classic hash brown potatoes. I use medium to large sized spuds)
  • 4 tablespoons butter or bacon fat
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Shred your potatoes. I don’t peel mine first (because I’m lazy. Because the peels provide extra nutrition. *A-hem*), but you can if you want.

If you’re a glutton for punishment, you can use a hand grater. I personally hate grating stuff by hand, so my food processor makes short work of the potatoes.

homemade shredded hash browns recipe

Now comes the important part: rinse your potatoes. The starch on the potatoes is what tends to make them gummy and sticky. We want it outta there.

I simply put my shredded potatoes in a colander, and rinse until the water is clear, not cloudy.

Allow the potatoes to drain thoroughly. I like to squeeze ’em a bit to get out all the moisture I can, or you can pat them dry with a clean dish towel.

Toss in the salt and pepper. Don’t forget this step. Seasoning is important…

homemade shredded hash browns recipe

Meanwhile, heat up the butter or bacon fat in your skillet until it’s melted. I use my 12″ cast iron skillet, because I’m cool like that.

homemade shredded hash browns recipe

Place the potatoes in the pan, give them a quick stir, then leave them alone to cook on medium-low heat.

The leaving alone part is important. Don’t fuss with them, just let them cook on that side for 8-10 minutes or so.

Now give them a flip. I’m not talented enough to flip the entire potato mass at once, so I flip it in sections. It doesn’t matter how you do it, just get it flipped.

Cook the other side 5-8 minutes, or until it’s that lovely shade of golden brown and appropriately crispy.

Serve immediately. Accompany with ketchup if you want, or eat plain for pure shredded hash brown goodness.

homemade shredded hash browns recipe

Kitchen Notes:

  • If you don’t want to use butter or bacon fat, coconut oil will work in this recipe. I do think butter or bacon grease will offer more flavor, though.
  • Every stovetop is different, so watch the pan closely the first time you make these. You want the heat high enough to crisp up the potatoes, but not so hot that it burns the bottom before the middle has time to cook.
  • It’s tempting to try to crowd the pan with more potatoes (I get greedy sometimes…), but keep in mind that if you do, you’ll likely end up with soft/soggy hash browns. In order for them to nicely crisp up, they need to have room to cook.
  • Serve your homemade hash browns alongside some of my other favorite breakfast foods, like:

4.0 from 2 reviews
Shredded Hash Browns Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: Breakfast
 
Ingredients
  • 2-3 potatoes (Any type will work, but Russets are classic hash brown potatoes. I use medium to large sized spuds)
  • 4 tablespoons butter or bacon fat
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Shred your potatoes. I don't peel mine first, but you can if you want.
  2. Rinse your potatoes.
  3. I simply put my shredded potatoes in a colander, and rinse until the water is clear, not cloudy.
  4. Allow the potatoes to drain thoroughly. I like to squeeze 'em a bit to get out all the moisture I can, or you can pat them dry with a clean dish towel.
  5. Toss in the salt and pepper.
  6. Meanwhile, heat up the butter or bacon fat in your skillet until it's melted.
  7. Place the potatoes in the pan, give them a quick stir, then leave them alone to cook on medium-low heat.
  8. The leaving alone part is important. Don't fuss with them, just let them cook on that side for 8-10 minutes or so.
  9. Now give them a flip. I'm not talented enough to flip the entire potato mass at once, so I flip it in sections. It doesn't matter how you do it, just get it flipped.
  10. Cook the other side 5-8 minutes, or until it's that lovely shade of golden brown and appropriately crispy.
  11. Serve immediately. Accompany with ketchup if you want, or eat plain for pure shredded hash brown goodness.

 

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6 Strategies for Fly Control in the Chicken Coop http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/fly-control-chicken-coop.html http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/06/fly-control-chicken-coop.html#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2015 18:57:41 +0000 http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/?p=14469 “Keep your mouth shut…” That used to be my routine bit of advice for anyone entering my chicken coop during the summer months. Fly control in the chicken coop used to feel like a losing battle for me, and the results were… gross. The cloud of black, buzzing flies used to be so thick when […]

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fly control in the chicken coop

“Keep your mouth shut…”

That used to be my routine bit of advice for anyone entering my chicken coop during the summer months.

Fly control in the chicken coop used to feel like a losing battle for me, and the results were… gross. The cloud of black, buzzing flies used to be so thick when you’d open the door, you almost needed a welding helmet to keep them out of your eyes and mouth.

If you think I’ve been talking about bugs a lot lately, it’s because, well, I’m a little obsessed with natural fly control strategies… When you have big piles of future compost (aka manure…) sitting behind your barn, it tends to attract a lot of flies, which end up in your house, in your barn, in your food, in your homemade lemonade… You get the picture.

Unless you want to blast your homestead with massive amounts of pesticides (and I don’t), I have yet to find a one-size-fits-all cure for dealing with summer bugs on the homestead. However, taking a multi-faceted approach has been very successful for me.

In fact, I currently have fewer flies in my chicken coop than I do my house… For reals. If any of you have tips for getting Prairie Kids to keep the front door shut, let me know. But in the meantime, I’ll think you’ll like these strategies for natural fly control in the chicken coop—>

(this post contains affiliate links)

6 Strategies for Fly Control in the Chicken Coop

1. Fly Predators

Fight fire with fire. Or in this case, fight the annoying bugs with good bugs. I’m still a newbie to fly predators, but am hopeful thus far, especially considering the rave reviews I’ve heard from other homesteaders and horse/agricultural folks.  I released my first fly predator shipment mid-May, and my second shipment came last week.

fly control in the chicken coop

How do Fly Predators Work?

After you order, you’ll get a lovely little baggie of predator pupae (cocoon things) in the mail. Let the bag sit for a few days until the tiny predators begin to hatch, then deposit them in key spots (aka manure piles) around your barnyard. The adult predators feast on the pupa of the annoying flies, and you get a fly relief program that doesn’t require pesticides. One caveat: chickens like to eat the predator pupae, so try to deposit them in an area where your chickens don’t have easy access.

2. Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous Earth (DE) is just handy to have around, period. DE is a fine powder made from the fossilized remains of algae, or diatoms. I use it in various applications around my barnyard, garden, and the coop as a natural pest deterrent. Some people also feed it to their livestock/chickens and claim it works from an internal aspect as well.

fly control in the chicken coop

To use Diatomaceous Earth in the Chicken Coop:

Sprinkle DE in and around coop bedding or in areas where chickens take their dust baths. DE works from a mechanical aspect, not a chemical one, as it tends to dry out insects and make areas less hospitable for larvae.

The key with DE is not to expect it to be a ‘miracle fix’, but rather a component of a full fly-prevention program.

Diatomaceous Earth Cautions:

  • Always be sure to purchase food-grade diatomaceous earth, not the stuff designed for pools.
  • Wear a mask while sprinkling DE. It is a fine particulate that may cause lung irritation.
  • Allow the dust to settle and the coop to ventilate a bit before allowing the chickens back in (to minimize the dust in the air they would be breathing).

Get the full scoop on diatomaceous earth and its many uses here.

3. Hang Water Bags

An old wives tale? Maybe. But considering it costs practically nothing to try, why not?

How to Do It:

  • Fill a heavy-duty gallon-sized bag (Ziploc freezer bags would work) half-full with water
  • Add 1-2 pennies.
  • Hang by doorways and entrances to the coop.

Some people say this is dumb, while others swear by it. If you have a good water-baggie story, be sure to let me know in the comments!

4. Make Essential Oil or Herbal Sprays

Again, not a miracle fix. But a part of an overall fly program? You bet! There are many, many herbs and essential oils that bugs just plain don’t like, and mixing them into a spray is a great way to make your chicken coop even less appealing to our little buzzing friends. An added bonus: it makes your coop smell all happy.

A Few Essential Oils Bugs Hate:

Rosemary, basil, dill, peppermint, spearmint, lavender, thyme, geranium, lemongrass, citronella, lemon, wild orange, etc.

A Few Herbs Bugs Hate:

Rosemary, mint, basil, dill, lavender, thyme, bay leaves, tansy, etc.

fly control in the chicken coop

Chicken Coop Fly Repellent Recipe

Combine all ingredients in a spray bottle. Shake well, and spritz generously in the coop wherever flies congregate. (For me, that’s around the main door. It has a window in it and always has the most flies around it– unless I keep it sprayed down, that is.)

Other ideas:

  • Hang bunches of fresh herbs in various places in the coop
  • Place fresh herbs in nesting boxes. Not only do many herbs deter flies, but your chickens will love it.
  • Mix dried herbs into your nesting box bedding.
  • Plant an herb garden close to the coop. The challenge with this would be keeping the chickens out of the herbs, but that’s a post for another day…

NOTE: This tip won’t work well unless you utilize Tip #5, which is—->

5. Keep it Clean

Sounds obvious, right? But man, it’s effective (and doesn’t cost you a cent)! Flies like stinky, smelly, sticky, sweet things. Therefore, one of the best ways to discourage flies from congregating is to remove aforementioned stinky, smelly, sticky, or sweet things.

For me, this means cleaning out and freshening the coop more frequently to remove areas of wet manure (a fly’s #1 favorite substance). The main offending areas are underneath roosts and perches. Some folks place a board under those areas, so they can easily carry the board outside to scrape it off. I personally just make it a point to clean the bedding under the roosts more frequently, or remove the big piles.

I also add fresh bedding frequently (to reduce the smell), turn over existing dry bedding, and sprinkle on my diatomaceous earth in the process.

Also, while I love to feed my chickens scraps, the food residue can be a huge fly attractant in the hot summer months. Therefore, I always put the scraps outside in the summer, NEVER inside the coop, and I try to rake up any leftovers. Otherwise, you’ll end up with crazy fly swarms.

6. Fly Traps & Fly Strips

Can we all just take a moment to recognize the humble fly strip? Lowly though it may be, it offers immediate results (yes, I have fly strips hanging in my kitchen…), and it doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.

fly control in the chicken coop

While you can certainly use fly strips in your coop,depending on how many flies you have, you might find yourself replacing fly strips quite frequently… If that’s the case, a better option is a fly trap.

You can purchase fly traps (and accompanying attractants/bait) from Amazon or your local feed store, OR make your own fly trap from an old soda bottle instead.

fly control in the chicken coop

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