Homemade Liquid Fence Recipe

homemade liquid fence recipe

What do you say when your 5 year-old hands you a headless rabbit?

Yeah, I was tongue-tied too.

We were out working in the yard when I pointed out to Prairie Girl that her barn cat was carrying a freshly-caught bunny in its mouth.

A split-second later, I heard “Here, Mommy” and turned around to see her holding a decapitated rabbit by it’s hind legs.

Followed by, “Hang on, I’ll get the head too…

I stuttered for a minute before quickly explaining the rabbit was beyond the point of saving. Prairie Girl begrudgingly returned the bunny to the annoyed cat, and I couldn’t help but smile at the thought of my blonde-headed little girl wrestling a headless rabbit from the mouth of a hungry kitty. She seems to have inherited her mama’s strong stomach.

But that brings us to the topic of rabbits.

We have a rabbit epidemic…

It wasn’t so bad when we had our two athletic dogs, but ever since they passed away, the bunny population has sky-rocketed. Our remaining dogs (an old, fat one, and a big, slow one) just aren’t cutting it, and although the barn cats will grab one here and there, they still aren’t making a dent.

Truthfully, the rabbits wouldn’t bother me much if they would just stay away from my vegetables. We have a fence around the garden (hog panels plus chicken wire at the bottom), but I think they are still squeezing in somewhere.

And they have done a very thorough job of eating every.single.one of my cucumber plants down to the nubs.

I’m not impressed.

Because I want pickles.

I’ve been doing a lot of research lately on rabbit repelling sprays, and versions of this liquid fence recipe get rave reviews. The key is to make it stinky… Very, very stinky.

So I mixed up a BIG batch and have been spraying it religiously.

Some folks say it works for deer too, but since we don’t have deer problems in our garden, I can’t vouch for that.

homemade liquid fence recipe

Homemade Liquid Fence® Recipe

Crack the eggs and combine them with the garlic and water in a bucket (use an old bucket you don’t mind getting icky).

Cover the mixture, and set it outside in the sun for 24-48 hours. Yup, that’s right. We want it to ferment and fester and get really, er… strong.

After it’s had time to get nice and smelly, strain out the garlic chunks, then mix in the soap and clove essential oil.

Place the mixture in a sprayer and spray generously around any area of your garden or yard that is being overtaken by rabbits.

I spray mine around the perimeter of my garden, in between the rows that are having the most problems (cucumbers!), and even on some of the plants.

Reapply after heavy rains or watering.

homemade liquid fence recipe

Notes:

  • WEAR GLOVES with you apply this stuff! It stinks like crazy and the garlic makes it hard to wash off your skin completely. It doesn’t burn or anything. It just stinks.
  • I use a garden sprayer for my liquid fence recipe. It makes the application process much easier, as compared to using a small spray bottle. Although, if a small sprayer is all you have, it’ll still work, your hand just might get tired.
  • As with any spray I might be using on my plants, I try to apply this in the evenings and avoid the heat of the day. Sometimes a spray, combined with the sun’s rays, can “burn” a plant’s leaves a bit. I haven’t had any problems thus far, but just FYI.
  • You can totally cut this recipe in half if you want to make a smaller amount.
  • I let my sprayer sit a few days before cleaning it, and the egg residue clogged it up a bit. It’s best to use a full batch and then clean everything out between uses, if possible.
  • Have old eggs or even slightly rotten ones? This is a great way to get rid of them! The stinkier, the better…
  • If you don’t have clove essential oil, you can add 10-15 whole cloves to your liquid fence recipe and allow it to steep with the garlic before straining. Or, just omit the cloves altogether.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Homemade Liquid Fence Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: Garden DIY
 
Ingredients
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon dish soap
  • 10-20 drops clove essential oil -- optional
  • 1 gallon water
  • Pump sprayer
Instructions
  1. Crack the eggs and combine them with the garlic and water in a bucket (use an old bucket that you don't mind getting icky).
  2. Cover the mixture, and set it outside in the sun for 24-48 hours. Yup, that's right. We want it to ferment and fester and get really, er... strong.
  3. After it's had time to get nice and smelly, strain out the garlic chunks, then mix in the soap and clove essential oil.
  4. Place the mixture in a sprayer and spray generously around any area of your garden or yard that is being overtaken by rabbits.
  5. I spray mine around the perimeter of my garden, in between the rows that are having the most problems (cucumbers!), and even on some of the plants.
  6. Reapply after heavy rains or watering.

 

Homemade Bug Bite Relief Stick

homemade bug bite relief stick

It has begun.

They’re eating my vegetables. They’re eating my cows. They’re eating us.

Just like clockwork, every summer I find myself spending an inordinate amount of time battling bugs.

Hanging fly strips (best invention EVAH), making natural homemade insect repellents, sucking up moths with the vacuum, waging war with the fly swatter… It all comes with the territory when you live out in the country. Especially when you live out in the country and have piles of manure in your back pasture. *a-hem*

My homemade bug sprays work impressively well (get my cheat sheet below!), however, you can’t ever really expect to avoid all the bites… That’s where today’s recipe is pretty darn handy. Mix up a batch of these easy-to-transport tubes and take them with you on all those bug-filled summer adventures.

Click Here for Jill’s Free Printable DIY Bug Spray Cheat Sheet

homemade bug bite relief stick

(this post contains affiliate links)

Homemade Bug Bite Relief Stick

To make Herbal Infused Coconut Oil:

First off, it is a necessity your slow cooker have a ‘warm’ setting on it. Most cookers have a ‘low’ setting, but they are still too hot. We want to gently heat the herbs and oil, and if they become too hot, it will fry the herbs and leave you with an unpleasant result.

If you don’t have a slow cooker with a ‘warm’ setting, opt for another method of infusion instead, or just skip the herbs and use plain coconut oil.

Fill a small canning jar (I used half-pint size) half-way full with dried herbs.

My favorite herb options for this recipe are calendula, comfrey, chamomile, or plantain, as they all carry anti-itch or skin-soothing properties. I also prefer dried herbs, as they don’t contain the moisture of fresh herbs, which reduces the possibility of spoilage in the final product.

Melt the coconut oil, and pour it over the dried herbs until it covers them by at least several inches (more is fine, too). Place the lids on the jars.

homemade bug bite relief stick

Place a towel in the bottom of your crockpot, place the jars on the towel. Add water to the crockpot until it comes about halfway up the sides of the jars.

Set the slow cooker on the “warm” setting and allow it to sit for 12-24 hours. Strain the oil using a fine-mesh strainer, discard the herbs, and store the infused oil in a cool, dark place.

To Make the Bug Bite Relief Sticks:

Using a double boiler, slowly melt the coconut oil and beeswax.

If you don’t have a double boiler, simply use an oven-safe container to hold the wax/oil and place it in a small saucepan of water. An old tin can works great for this, especially since it can be tough to clean the beeswax off your regular kitchen utensils.

It shouldn’t take long to melt the beeswax, and I usually pull it off the oven as soon as it’s melted all the way. No need to let it simmer or get too hot.

Allow the beeswax/coconut oil mixture to cool slightly, then mix in the essential oils.

homemade bug bite relief stick

Pour the mixture into empty chapstick tubes. If you don’t have chapstick tubes handy, a small tin or ointment container will work just fine too.

homemade bug bite relief stick

Allow the tubes to harden, label, and directly apply as needed to any annoying mosquito bites or insect bites you may be dealing with.

Download and print my FREE bug bite relief stick labels here.

If you want to get all fancy, you can print the labels on sticker/label paper (waterproof is best). However, stayed true to my redneck-ways and just printed on regular paper and affixed to my tubes with a piece of clear tape. It works. 😉

homemade bug bite relief stick

Notes:

  • I love these bug bite relief tubes as they are handy to pop into a backpack, beach bag, or purse. However, avoid leaving them in a hot car for a prolonged period, as they may soften and melt a bit.
  • Lavender and peppermint essential oils are an important part of this recipe as they both contain skin-soothing properties. However, feel free to play around with other essential oil combinations. Frankincense, melaleuca (tea tree), patchouli, and/or roman chamomile are also good choices.
  • Wondering what do to with your leftover herbal-infused coconut oil? Use it to make my homemade udder balm recipe or my homemade hand cream recipe.

Need bug bite relief right now and don’t have time to mix up this recipe? Try this roller bottle blend instead:

homemade bug bite relief stick

Quick & Easy Bug Bite Roller Bottle

  • 2 teaspoons of liquid vegetable oil (jojoba oil, sweet almond oil, apricot oil, avocado oil, olive oil, or fractionated coconut oil will all work)
  • 10 drops lavender essential
  • 10 drops peppermint essential oil
  • Empty 10 mL roller bottle (if using a roller bottle of a different size, adjust accordingly)

Mix all ingredients together in the roller bottle. Apply as needed.

homemade bug bite relief stick

5.0 from 1 reviews
Homemade Bug Bite Relief Stick
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY
Serves: 4-5 tubes
 
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons herbal infused coconut oil (directions below) or regular coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons beeswax pastiles
  • 10 drops lavender essential oil
  • 10 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 4-5 empty chapstick tubes
Instructions
  1. To make Herbal Infused Coconut Oil:
  2. First off, it is a necessity your slow cooker have a 'warm' setting on it. Most cookers have a 'low' setting, but they are still too hot. We want to gently heat the herbs and oil, and if they become too hot, it will fry the herbs and leave you with an unpleasant result.
  3. If you don't have a slow cooker with a 'warm' setting, opt for another method of infusion instead, or just skip the herbs and use plain coconut oil.
  4. Fill a small canning jar (I used half-pint size) half-way full with dried herbs.
  5. My favorite herb options for this recipe are calendula, comfrey, chamomile, or plantain, as they all carry anti-itch or skin-soothing properties. I also prefer dried herbs, as they don't contain the moisture of fresh herbs, which reduces the possibility of spoilage in the final product.
  6. Melt the coconut oil, and pour it over the dried herbs until it covers them by at least several inches (more is fine, too). Place the lids on the jars.
  7. Place a towel in the bottom of your crockpot, place the jars on the towel. Add water to the crockpot until it comes about halfway up the sides of the jars.
  8. Set the slow cooker on the "warm" setting and allow it to sit for 12-24 hours. Strain the oil using a fine-mesh strainer, discard the herbs, and store the infused oil in a cool, dark place.
  9. To Make the Bug Bite Relief Sticks:
  10. Using a double boiler, slowly melt the coconut oil and beeswax.
  11. If you don't have a double boiler, simply use an oven-safe container to hold the wax/oil and place it in a small saucepan of water. An old tin can works great for this, especially since it can be tough to clean the beeswax off your kitchen utensils.
  12. It shouldn't take long to melt the beeswax, and I usually pull it off the oven as soon as it's melted all the way. No need to let it simmer or get too hot.
  13. Allow the beeswax/coconut oil mixture to cool slightly, then mix in the essential oils.
  14. Pour the mixture into empty chapstick tubes. If you don't have chapstick tubes handy, a small tin or ointment container will work just fine too.
  15. Allow the tubes to harden, label, and directly apply as needed to any annoying mosquito bites or insect bites you may be dealing with.

 

Homemade Hot Process Soap Recipe in a Crock Pot

homemade hot process soap recipe

The million dollar question:

Do REAL homesteaders use crock pots and stick blenders?

Well, I’m still not exactly sure what qualifies a “real” homesteader, but I’m gonna answer that question with a resounding YES.

I have a deep appreciation for my stick blender. And my dishwasher. And my washing machine.

And I’m pretty sure Ma Ingalls would have loved them, too, if she could have fit them into her covered wagon.

So, why I am talkin’ ’bout appliances this fine morning? Because appliances have turned soap making, a once long and arduous process, into a snap. Making a batch of gorgeous homemade soap only takes about a 90 minutes, where it once took much, much longer. And I’m showing you the ropes today.

But first, let’s answer a few common questions:

But, do I have to use LYE?!

Yep. You do. Lye is a part of any true soap making process. The basic formula for soap is:

liquid + fat + lye

Lye produces the chemical reaction which turns fat into soap. Otherwise, you’d end up washing yourself with a big blob of animal fat, or coconut oil, or whatever. Lye is our friend.

A lot of people have a fear of lye– I know I did. But the truth is, if you take the proper precautions, there’s nothing to be scared of. (Kind of like our buddy, the pressure canner).

homemade hot process soap recipe

Hot Process Soap vs. Cold Process Soap

Hot process soap making (aka crock pot soap) and cold process soap making are pretty much identical processes. The main difference is that hot process soap allows the chemical reaction to complete immediately, while cold process soap allows the chemical reaction to happen over a curing period of six weeks.

I’ve used both methods, but I prefer hot process soap (crock pot soap) for the following reasons:

  • I can use the soap the following day, no six-week wait. (I like instant gratification)
  • I don’t have to find a place in my tiny house to cure the soap for six weeks, out of the way of kids and animals.
  • It really doesn’t take much more time.

**UPDATE** Come to find out, even though I’ve been told forever how hot process soap is ready to use immediately, this isn’t the case. I have since learned from a few soap makers who shared their knowledge that while hot process doesn’t necessarily require a six week wait, you will find the texture and hardness of the soap improves after a 1-2 week wait time. So while you can use it right away if you want, it’ll be better if you still wait a bit.

homemade hot process soap recipe

The biggest downfall in regards to crockpot soap is that it produces a slightly less-pretty bar, with a bit more lumpiness on top. However, considering I’m mainly interested making soaps for family and friends, and not becoming an artisan soap-maker, I’m totally cool with that.

What supplies do I need?

Not too many! But there are a few (inexpensive) items that will make your soap-making life a hundred times easier:

homemade hot process soap recipe

(some of these are affiliate links)

  • Crockpot — I found an older crockpot at a yard sale for $5. It’s my official soap-making slow cooker
  • Glass or Pyrex measuring cups and bowls — You’ll want to avoid metal utensils/dishes in your soap making process since lye reacts with some metals.
  • A digital kitchen scale — Seriously. You’re gonna want one of these. I got this one for $12 on Amazon, and it’s a gem
  • A stick blender — Sure, if you’re super committed, you can stand there and stir your soap for a couple hours… I’m not that committed. The stick blender makes it happen in mere minutes. It’s worth every. single. penny.
  • Soap mold — For the longest time, I’ve used a simple cardboard box lined with parchment paper. Really, anything can work as a soap mold, including shoe boxes, loaf pans, misc. kitchen pans, Pringles chip tubes, you name it. As long as you can line it with parchment paper so you can remove the soap, you can use it. I recently splurged on this silicone soap mold from Amazon. It’s nice, but not a necessity.
  • Safety gear — This includes eye protection, gloves, and long sleeves, to guard you from the lye.

Hot Process Soap Ingredients:

  • Lye — Sometimes you can find lye at your local home improvement store (usually in the plumbing section), but I generally have a very tough time sourcing it locally… I ordered my last bottle from Amazon. Just remember, you MUST only use 100% pure lye (sodium hydroxide). Nothing else can be added.
  • Fat/Oil — There are SO many different soap fat options out there, it’ll blow your mind. If you get on some of the fancy soap-making websites, you’ll find detailed recipes calling for many different types of oil or fat in each recipe. Since I’m not an artisan soap maker, I like to keep it simple. My soaps generally contain olive oil, palm oil, coconut oil, or tallow (tallow soap recipe coming soon), in various quantities. Each oil has different properties it’ll lend to the soap. The more soap you make, the more you’ll find out which oils you like to use best.
  • Liquid — I usually use water in my soap recipes, but milk is also a popular option. If you are using water, make sure to only use distilled water. That way, you’ll avoid any potential issues with the minerals your tap water might contain.

Alrighty, enough talk. On to the recipe!

Basic Hot Process Soap Recipe (aka Crock Pot Soap)

(A note about amounts: This recipe produces about 30 oz of soap. I chose this amount because of the size of my mold. However, you can absolutely play around with the oil amounts in any soap recipe, as long as you run the final amounts through a lye calculator to make sure you are using a safe amount of lye. I always, always run my numbers through the lye calculator at www.thesage.com before I make any soap recipe)

  • 10 oz olive oil
  • 20 oz coconut oil
  • 9 oz distilled water
  • 4.78 oz 100% pure lye
  • Essential oils for scent (optional)

Other Equipment:

  • Digital scale
  • Safety gear (safety glasses, long sleeves, gloves)
  • Stick blender
  • Crock pot
  • Non-metal dishes and utensils

To begin, measure out the olive and coconut oil. Place the coconut oil in the slow cooker, and turn it on so it begins to melt. (If you want to speed up the melting process, you can melt it on the stovetop in a saucepan instead.)

hot-process-soap-coconut-oil

As the coconut oil melts, measure out the other ingredients, weighing each and every one on the digital scale first. In soap making, we always measure by weight, not by volume.

I measure my water into a Pyrex measuring cup, and the lye into a small glass bowl. Make sure you have your protective gear (eye protection, gloves, long sleeves) in place before you start handling the lye.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Once the coconut oil has completely melted, add the olive oil to the crockpot and allow it to mingle and warm up.

Now it’s time to mix the lye and the water. Make sure you do this in a place with plenty of ventilation, as the lye will produce a reaction with the water and emit fumes. I prefer to do it outside, or under my stove hood with the fan on.

homemade hot process soap recipe
dissolving the lye into the water

Slowly add the lye to the water, as you continually stir the water. The chemical reaction will happen quickly, and the mixture will heat up, so make sure you don’t grab the water container without gloves or an oven mitt.

**Important** ALWAYS add the lye to the water. NEVER add the water to the lye. Adding water to the lye can result in an unpleasant Mount Vesuvius type of reaction…

Once the lye is completely dissolved into the water (you’ll want to continue to gently stir until this happens), add it to the melted oils in the crockpot. Do this slowly, all while stirring the soap mixture.

Now, grab your stick blender. Stir and mix the mixture with your stick blender. I don’t run it continually, but rather pulse it for short spurts, stirring the mixture as I go. You’ll see it blend together rather quickly and it will thicken.

homemade hot process soap recipe
Stirring and thickening over the course of several minutes

We’re looking for it to come to “trace.” You’ll know this has occurred because your soap mixture will have the consistently of pudding, and will hold its shape when you plop some on top. Like this—>

homemade hot process soap recipe
The lovely pudding-like trace stage

Once trace has occurred, the hard part is over! Simply place the lid on the crockpot, set the timer for 50 minutes, and allow the mixture to cook on LOW.

While you don’t need to necessarily babysit the crock, you will want to be semi-close to make sure it doesn’t bubble over. Mine always tries to rise out of my crockpot at least once during the process, and I have to give it a quick stir to calm it down. It usually only takes once, though. Otherwise, you shouldn’t need to stir it.

homemade hot process soap recipe
The stages of cooking

While you’re waiting, line your soap molds with parchment paper (if you’re using a silicone mold, skip this step) and prepare any additives (see below).

Once the 50 minutes has passed, it’s time to test the soap to make sure the lye has reacted with the oils completely and no longer remains in the mixture.

I like to do this by grabbing a small amount of the soap mixture, allowing to cool for a second, and then touching it to my tongue. If it “zaps” me, I know there is still lye remaining in the mixture and it needs to cook longer. If it just tastes like soap, we’re ready for the next step.

If you are mixing in any additives, turn off the crockpot and allow the mixture to cool briefly before mixing in any essential oils. However, you can’t wait too long, as the mixture will begin to set up, so watch it carefully.

homemade hot process soap recipe
Adding essential oils

Pour the soap mixture into the mold, making sure to press it into all the corners and smooth out the top as much as possible.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Set it aside for 12-24 hours, or until it sets completely. (Usually, overnight is plenty of time).

Remove the soap from the mold, cut it into bars (I got my fancy crinkle cutter here, but you can just use a plain ol’ knife, too), and allow it to dry for another day or so to allow it to harden up a bit.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Now it’s ready to use. You made soap! Can you believe it?! You’re officially a homesteading rockstar. :)

Notes:

  • While I use high-quality olive oil and coconut oil in my cooking, I don’t feel bad about using the lesser, cheaper grades for soap making.
  • I won’t go into all the details of additives in this post, but some folks like to add things like coffee grounds, dried herbs, or ground oatmeal to their homemade soaps. Essential oils are also a fabulous addition if you want your soap to smell purty. You can also purchase colorants and dyes, but I never use them. I’m fine with naturally-colored homestead soap.
  • One of the benefits of hot process soap is that there should not be any lye remaining on the crockpot or soap molds. This makes clean-up easier. However, to clean the lye bowl and stick blender, simply allow them to soak in a mixture of hot, soapy water and vinegar. The vinegar will neutralize the lye, and ensures you don’t burn yourself while washing them later.
  • This recipe is 5% superfat. This means that we added extra oil to make sure the lye would have a complete chemical reaction, so it would no longer remain in the finished product. This is why it is so important to run all your soap measurements through a lye calculator first. Otherwise, you could potentially be making a recipe with an insufficient amount of oil, which can result in unreacted, caustic lye remaining in your bar.
  • I like to scrape the leftovers from my crockpot into a small ball and use it right away while the bars are setting up.
  • The sky’s the limit when it comes to the essential oils you can use in homemade soap! However, my current favorite addition to this recipe is 30 drops of patchouli and 20 drops of wild orange.
  • Don’t expect a super strong-smelling bar of soap unless you add copious amounts of essential oils to the recipe. (I’m talking, like, a LOT. Way more than 50 drops.) Another option is to purchase speciality soap scents/fragrances. I personally limit my oil usage to about 50 drops per batch because I purchase high-quality medicinal-grade oils and I don’t want to use an entire bottle in one sitting. A lighter-scented bar is fine with me.
  • You don’t have to make a soap recipe with multiple types of oil. You can definitely just use one type of oil if you wish. Pure olive oil soap will be very hard, as will pure tallow soap. Pure coconut oil soap has a lovely lather. Experiment and find out which oils you prefer.

5.0 from 9 reviews
Homemade Hot Process Soap Recipe in a Crock Pot
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY - Soap
 
Ingredients
  • 10 oz olive oil
  • 20 oz coconut oil
  • 9 oz distilled water
  • 4.78 oz 100% pure lye
  • Essential oils for scent (optional)
  • Other Equipment:
  • Digital scale
  • Safety gear (safety glasses, long sleeves, gloves)
  • Stick blender
  • Crock pot
  • Non-metal dishes and utensils
Instructions
  1. Measure out the olive and coconut oil.
  2. Place the coconut oil in the slow cooker, and turn it on so it begins to melt.
  3. Measure out the other ingredients, weighing each and every one on the digital scale first.
  4. Once the coconut oil has completely melted, add the olive oil to the crockpot and allow it to mingle and warm up.
  5. Add the lye to the water, stirring slowly. Do this in a place with ample ventilation, while wearing your safety equipment.
  6. Add the dissolved lye/water mixture to the melted oils in the crockpot. Stir gently.
  7. With the stick blender, continue to mix/stir for several minutes until you reach "trace."
  8. Place the lid on the crockpot, set the timer for 50 minutes, and allow the mixture to cook on LOW.
  9. If the soap tries to bubble out of the crockpot, give it a stir.
  10. Line the soap molds with parchment paper (if required)
  11. Once the 50 minutes has elapsed, perform the "zap test": I like to do this by grabbing a small amount of the soap mixture, allowing to cool for a second, and then touching it to my tongue. If it "zaps" me, I know there is still lye remaining in the mixture and it needs to cook longer. If it just tastes like soap, we're ready for the next step.
  12. Allow the mixture to cool slightly before adding any additives.
  13. Press/pour the soap mixture into the mold, making sure to press it into all the corners and smooth out the top as much as possible.
  14. Set it aside for 12-24 hours, or until it sets completely. (Usually, overnight is plenty of time).
  15. Remove the soap from the mold, cut it into bars.
  16. Allow it to dry for another day or so to allow it to harden up a bit.

 

How to Make Beeswax Candles

how to make beeswax candles -- a simple tutorial!

*Flicker flicker flicker*

When I’m sitting by the blazing wood stove on a cold winter’s night, I gotta have a candle. No ifs, ands, or buts, the moment is simply not complete without the dancing light of a burning wick.

Even though I’m dumped most of my candles in favor of my essential diffusers (because not only do my essential oils make my house smell good naturally, but they also can provide health benefits), I still crave the cozy ambiance of a good old-fashioned candle.

Sadly, even though most candles no longer contain toxic lead wicks, many you might purchase at the store still contain lots of junk, such as artificial scents and paraffin. In short– stuff you don’t want floating around the air of your home.

how-to-make-beeswax-candles-2

No worries though– we’re homesteaders–we’ve got this whole homemade candle thing covered.

I’ve already shown you how to make tallow candles, but just in case you happen to be short on tallow, you can follow the same method to learn how to make beeswax candles too. Beeswax burns beautifully and is a wonderful option for natural, non-toxic, homemade candles.

A note about beeswax: If you have bees, lucky you! 😉 Homegrown, filtered beeswax is a beautiful choice for homemade candles. However, if you don’t have bees yet (like me), you can always check with local beekeepers to see if someone has beeswax for sale. If you strike out there, Amazon is always an option too. (That’s where I got mine this time around).

how to make beeswax candles in mason jars

 

(this post contains affiliate links)

How to Make Beeswax Candles

(A Note About Amounts: One pound of beeswax equals approximately 20 ounces in volume. For this tutorial, I used one pound of beeswas pastilles. It filled the four small canning jars shown in the above photo. Thankfully, the recipe is very flexible, so if you have more or less beeswax, simply fill more or less containers!)

melting-beeswax

Place the beeswax into your dedicated container/can. Place the can inside a stock pot filled half-full with water.  Simmer over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally as it melts.

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

The goal is to get the wick to stay in the middle of the jar as we pour in the beeswax and it sets. You can accomplish this a variety of ways. For example:

  • Use a glue gun to stick the wick to the bottom of the jar
  • Attach the wick to the jar with super glue
  • Hold the wick in place with strips of masking tap
  • Use pencils or dowels to prop/stabilize the wick.
  • Or use a combination of these methods.

It doesn’t matter the method, as long as the wick stays in the center of the jar. In the above photos, I placed a dab of glue on the bottom of the wick to secure it to the bottom of the jar. I then curled the wick around a small dowel to keep it from tipping over.

Pour the melted beeswax into the jar, leaving one inch of room at the top. Set the jars aside and allow them to cool and set completely.

homemade-beeswax-candles

Trim the wick, light, and enjoy your homemade beeswax candles!

FAQ:

  • Will my beeswax candles go rancid? No. One of the benefits of beeswax is that it will not go rancid like soy wax or palm wax.
  • Can I scent my homemade beeswax candles? Sure! Many people use essentials to create natural aromatherapy candles. However, keep in mind that essential oils don’t love high temps, so often the scent will not be as strong as if you were using artificial fragrances. I usually just leave my homemade candles unscented, and then make my house smell pretty with my essential oil diffuser instead.
  • Wanna make homemade candles using tallow or lard? Click here for my full tallow candle tutorial.
  • How do I filter beeswax for my candles? Here’s a video that’ll show you how!

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

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How to Make Beeswax Candles
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY
 
Ingredients
  • Beeswax
  • Wicks
  • Glass jars (canning jars work great!)
  • Dedicated container, such as a #10 can, for melting the wax (because it's impossible to clean out afterwards!)
Instructions
  1. (A Note About Amounts: One pound of beeswax equals approximately 20 ounces in volume. For this tutorial, I used one pound of beeswas pastilles. It filled the four small canning jars shown in the above photo. Thankfully, the recipe is very flexible, so if you have more or less beeswax, simply fill more or less containers!)
  2. Place the beeswax into your dedicated container/can. Place the can inside a stock pot filled half-full with water. Simmer over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally as it melts.
  3. In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.
  4. The goal is to get the wick to stay in the middle of the jar as we pour in the beeswax and it sets. You can accomplish this a variety of ways.
  5. It doesn't matter the method, as long as the wick stays in the center of the jar. In the above photos, I placed a dab of glue on the bottom of the wick to secure it to the bottom of the jar. I then curled the wick around a small dowel to keep it from tipping over.
  6. Pour the melted beeswax into the jar, leaving one inch of room at the top. Set the jars aside and allow them to cool and set completely.
  7. Trim the wick, light, and enjoy your homemade beeswax candles!