Homemade Hot Process Soap Recipe in a Crock Pot

homemade hot process soap recipe

The million dollar question:

Do REAL homesteaders use crock pots and stick blenders?

Well, I’m still not exactly sure what qualifies a “real” homesteader, but I’m gonna answer that question with a resounding YES.

I have a deep appreciation for my stick blender. And my dishwasher. And my washing machine.

And I’m pretty sure Ma Ingalls would have loved them, too, if she could have fit them into her covered wagon.

So, why I am talkin’ ’bout appliances this fine morning? Because appliances have turned soap making, a once long and arduous process, into a snap. Making a batch of gorgeous homemade soap only takes about a 90 minutes, where it once took much, much longer. And I’m showing you the ropes today.

But first, let’s answer a few common questions:

But, do I have to use LYE?!

Yep. You do. Lye is a part of any true soap making process. The basic formula for soap is:

liquid + fat + lye

Lye produces the chemical reaction which turns fat into soap. Otherwise, you’d end up washing yourself with a big blob of animal fat, or coconut oil, or whatever. Lye is our friend.

A lot of people have a fear of lye– I know I did. But the truth is, if you take the proper precautions, there’s nothing to be scared of. (Kind of like our buddy, the pressure canner).

homemade hot process soap recipe

Hot Process Soap vs. Cold Process Soap

Hot process soap making (aka crock pot soap) and cold process soap making are pretty much identical processes. The main difference is that hot process soap allows the chemical reaction to complete immediately, while cold process soap allows the chemical reaction to happen over a curing period of six weeks.

I’ve used both methods, but I prefer hot process soap (crock pot soap) for the following reasons:

  • I can use the soap the following day, no six-week wait. (I like instant gratification)
  • I don’t have to find a place in my tiny house to cure the soap for six weeks, out of the way of kids and animals.
  • It really doesn’t take much more time.

homemade hot process soap recipe

The biggest downfall in regards to crockpot soap is that it produces a slightly less-pretty bar, with a bit more lumpiness on top. However, considering I’m mainly interested making soaps for family and friends, and not becoming an artisan soap-maker, I’m totally cool with that.

What supplies do I need?

Not too many! But there are a few (inexpensive) items that will make your soap-making life a hundred times easier:

homemade hot process soap recipe

(some of these are affiliate links)

  • Crockpot — I found an older crockpot at a yard sale for $5. It’s my official soap-making slow cooker
  • Glass or Pyrex measuring cups and bowls — You’ll want to avoid metal utensils/dishes in your soap making process since lye reacts with some metals.
  • A digital kitchen scale — Seriously. You’re gonna want one of these. I got this one for $12 on Amazon, and it’s a gem
  • A stick blender — Sure, if you’re super committed, you can stand there and stir your soap for a couple hours… I’m not that committed. The stick blender makes it happen in mere minutes. It’s worth every. single. penny.
  • Soap mold — For the longest time, I’ve used a simple cardboard box lined with parchment paper. Really, anything can work as a soap mold, including shoe boxes, loaf pans, misc. kitchen pans, Pringles chip tubes, you name it. As long as you can line it with parchment paper so you can remove the soap, you can use it. I recently splurged on this silicone soap mold from Amazon. It’s nice, but not a necessity.
  • Safety gear — This includes eye protection, gloves, and long sleeves, to guard you from the lye.

Hot Process Soap Ingredients:

  • Lye — Sometimes you can find lye at your local home improvement store (usually in the plumbing section), but I generally have a very tough time sourcing it locally… I ordered my last bottle from Amazon. Just remember, you MUST only use 100% pure lye (sodium hydroxide). Nothing else can be added.
  • Fat/Oil — There are SO many different soap fat options out there, it’ll blow your mind. If you get on some of the fancy soap-making websites, you’ll find detailed recipes calling for many different types of oil or fat in each recipe. Since I’m not an artisan soap maker, I like to keep it simple. My soaps generally contain olive oil, palm oil, coconut oil, or tallow (tallow soap recipe coming soon), in various quantities. Each oil has different properties it’ll lend to the soap. The more soap you make, the more you’ll find out which oils you like to use best.
  • Liquid — I usually use water in my soap recipes, but milk is also a popular option. If you are using water, make sure to only use distilled water. That way, you’ll avoid any potential issues with the minerals your tap water might contain.

Alrighty, enough talk. On to the recipe!

Basic Hot Process Soap Recipe (aka Crock Pot Soap)

(A note about amounts: This recipe produces about 30 oz of soap. I chose this amount because of the size of my mold. However, you can absolutely play around with the oil amounts in any soap recipe, as long as you run the final amounts through a lye calculator to make sure you are using a safe amount of lye. I always, always run my numbers through the lye calculator at www.thesage.com before I make any soap recipe)

  • 10 oz olive oil
  • 20 oz coconut oil
  • 9 oz distilled water
  • 4.78 oz 100% pure lye
  • Essential oils for scent (optional)

Other Equipment:

  • Digital scale
  • Safety gear (safety glasses, long sleeves, gloves)
  • Stick blender
  • Crock pot
  • Non-metal dishes and utensils

To begin, measure out the olive and coconut oil. Place the coconut oil in the slow cooker, and turn it on so it begins to melt. (If you want to speed up the melting process, you can melt it on the stovetop in a saucepan instead.)

hot-process-soap-coconut-oil

As the coconut oil melts, measure out the other ingredients, weighing each and every one on the digital scale first. In soap making, we always measure by weight, not by volume.

I measure my water into a Pyrex measuring cup, and the lye into a small glass bowl. Make sure you have your protective gear (eye protection, gloves, long sleeves) in place before you start handling the lye.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Once the coconut oil has completely melted, add the olive oil to the crockpot and allow it to mingle and warm up.

Now it’s time to mix the lye and the water. Make sure you do this in a place with plenty of ventilation, as the lye will produce a reaction with the water and emit fumes. I prefer to do it outside, or under my stove hood with the fan on.

homemade hot process soap recipe
dissolving the lye into the water

Slowly add the lye to the water, as you continually stir the water. The chemical reaction will happen quickly, and the mixture will heat up, so make sure you don’t grab the water container without gloves or an oven mitt.

**Important** ALWAYS add the lye to the water. NEVER add the water to the lye. Adding water to the lye can result in an unpleasant Mount Vesuvius type of reaction…

Once the lye is completely dissolved into the water (you’ll want to continue to gently stir until this happens), add it to the melted oils in the crockpot. Do this slowly, all while stirring the soap mixture.

Now, grab your stick blender. Stir and mix the mixture with your stick blender. I don’t run it continually, but rather pulse it for short spurts, stirring the mixture as I go. You’ll see it blend together rather quickly and it will thicken.

homemade hot process soap recipe
Stirring and thickening over the course of several minutes

We’re looking for it to come to “trace.” You’ll know this has occurred because your soap mixture will have the consistently of pudding, and will hold its shape when you plop some on top. Like this—>

homemade hot process soap recipe
The lovely pudding-like trace stage

Once trace has occurred, the hard part is over! Simply place the lid on the crockpot, set the timer for 50 minutes, and allow the mixture to cook on LOW.

While you don’t need to necessarily babysit the crock, you will want to be semi-close to make sure it doesn’t bubble over. Mine always tries to rise out of my crockpot at least once during the process, and I have to give it a quick stir to calm it down. It usually only takes once, though. Otherwise, you shouldn’t need to stir it.

homemade hot process soap recipe
The stages of cooking

While you’re waiting, line your soap molds with parchment paper (if you’re using a silicone mold, skip this step) and prepare any additives (see below).

Once the 50 minutes has passed, it’s time to test the soap to make sure the lye has reacted with the oils completely and no longer remains in the mixture.

I like to do this by grabbing a small amount of the soap mixture, allowing to cool for a second, and then touching it to my tongue. If it “zaps” me, I know there is still lye remaining in the mixture and it needs to cook longer. If it just tastes like soap, we’re ready for the next step.

If you are mixing in any additives, turn off the crockpot and allow the mixture to cool briefly before mixing in any essential oils. However, you can’t wait too long, as the mixture will begin to set up, so watch it carefully.

homemade hot process soap recipe
Adding essential oils

Pour the soap mixture into the mold, making sure to press it into all the corners and smooth out the top as much as possible.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Set it aside for 12-24 hours, or until it sets completely. (Usually, overnight is plenty of time).

Remove the soap from the mold, cut it into bars (I got my fancy crinkle cutter here, but you can just use a plain ol’ knife, too), and allow it to dry for another day or so to allow it to harden up a bit.

homemade hot process soap recipe

Now it’s ready to use. You made soap! Can you believe it?! You’re officially a homesteading rockstar. :)

Notes:

  • While I use high-quality olive oil and coconut oil in my cooking, I don’t feel bad about using the lesser, cheaper grades for soap making.
  • I won’t go into all the details of additives in this post, but some folks like to add things like coffee grounds, dried herbs, or ground oatmeal to their homemade soaps. Essential oils are also a fabulous addition if you want your soap to smell purty. You can also purchase colorants and dyes, but I never use them. I’m fine with naturally-colored homestead soap.
  • One of the benefits of hot process soap is that there should not be any lye remaining on the crockpot or soap molds. This makes clean-up easier. However, to clean the lye bowl and stick blender, simply allow them to soak in a mixture of hot, soapy water and vinegar. The vinegar will neutralize the lye, and ensures you don’t burn yourself while washing them later.
  • This recipe is 5% superfat. This means that we added extra oil to make sure the lye would have a complete chemical reaction, so it would no longer remain in the finished product. This is why it is so important to run all your soap measurements through a lye calculator first. Otherwise, you could potentially be making a recipe with an insufficient amount of oil, which can result in unreacted, caustic lye remaining in your bar.
  • I like to scrape the leftovers from my crockpot into a small ball and use it right away while the bars are setting up.
  • The sky’s the limit when it comes to the essential oils you can use in homemade soap! However, my current favorite addition to this recipe is 30 drops of patchouli and 20 drops of wild orange.
  • You don’t have to make a soap recipe with multiple types of oil. You can definitely just use one type of oil if you wish. Pure olive oil soap will be very hard, as will pure tallow soap. Pure coconut oil soap has a lovely lather. Experiment and find out which oils you prefer.

5.0 from 9 reviews
Homemade Hot Process Soap Recipe in a Crock Pot
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY - Soap
 
Ingredients
  • 10 oz olive oil
  • 20 oz coconut oil
  • 9 oz distilled water
  • 4.78 oz 100% pure lye
  • Essential oils for scent (optional)
  • Other Equipment:
  • Digital scale
  • Safety gear (safety glasses, long sleeves, gloves)
  • Stick blender
  • Crock pot
  • Non-metal dishes and utensils
Instructions
  1. Measure out the olive and coconut oil.
  2. Place the coconut oil in the slow cooker, and turn it on so it begins to melt.
  3. Measure out the other ingredients, weighing each and every one on the digital scale first.
  4. Once the coconut oil has completely melted, add the olive oil to the crockpot and allow it to mingle and warm up.
  5. Add the lye to the water, stirring slowly. Do this in a place with ample ventilation, while wearing your safety equipment.
  6. Add the dissolved lye/water mixture to the melted oils in the crockpot. Stir gently.
  7. With the stick blender, continue to mix/stir for several minutes until you reach "trace."
  8. Place the lid on the crockpot, set the timer for 50 minutes, and allow the mixture to cook on LOW.
  9. If the soap tries to bubble out of the crockpot, give it a stir.
  10. Line the soap molds with parchment paper (if required)
  11. Once the 50 minutes has elapsed, perform the "zap test": I like to do this by grabbing a small amount of the soap mixture, allowing to cool for a second, and then touching it to my tongue. If it "zaps" me, I know there is still lye remaining in the mixture and it needs to cook longer. If it just tastes like soap, we're ready for the next step.
  12. Allow the mixture to cool slightly before adding any additives.
  13. Press/pour the soap mixture into the mold, making sure to press it into all the corners and smooth out the top as much as possible.
  14. Set it aside for 12-24 hours, or until it sets completely. (Usually, overnight is plenty of time).
  15. Remove the soap from the mold, cut it into bars.
  16. Allow it to dry for another day or so to allow it to harden up a bit.

 

How to Make Beeswax Candles

how to make beeswax candles -- a simple tutorial!

*Flicker flicker flicker*

When I’m sitting by the blazing wood stove on a cold winter’s night, I gotta have a candle. No ifs, ands, or buts, the moment is simply not complete without the dancing light of a burning wick.

Even though I’m dumped most of my candles in favor of my essential diffusers (because not only do my essential oils make my house smell good naturally, but they also can provide health benefits), I still crave the cozy ambiance of a good old-fashioned candle.

Sadly, even though most candles no longer contain toxic lead wicks, many you might purchase at the store still contain lots of junk, such as artificial scents and paraffin. In short– stuff you don’t want floating around the air of your home.

how-to-make-beeswax-candles-2

No worries though– we’re homesteaders–we’ve got this whole homemade candle thing covered.

I’ve already shown you how to make tallow candles, but just in case you happen to be short on tallow, you can follow the same method to learn how to make beeswax candles too. Beeswax burns beautifully and is a wonderful option for natural, non-toxic, homemade candles.

A note about beeswax: If you have bees, lucky you! 😉 Homegrown, filtered beeswax is a beautiful choice for homemade candles. However, if you don’t have bees yet (like me), you can always check with local beekeepers to see if someone has beeswax for sale. If you strike out there, Amazon is always an option too. (That’s where I got mine this time around).

how to make beeswax candles in mason jars

 

(this post contains affiliate links)

How to Make Beeswax Candles

(A Note About Amounts: One pound of beeswax equals approximately 20 ounces in volume. For this tutorial, I used one pound of beeswas pastilles. It filled the four small canning jars shown in the above photo. Thankfully, the recipe is very flexible, so if you have more or less beeswax, simply fill more or less containers!)

melting-beeswax

Place the beeswax into your dedicated container/can. Place the can inside a stock pot filled half-full with water.  Simmer over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally as it melts.

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

The goal is to get the wick to stay in the middle of the jar as we pour in the beeswax and it sets. You can accomplish this a variety of ways. For example:

  • Use a glue gun to stick the wick to the bottom of the jar
  • Attach the wick to the jar with super glue
  • Hold the wick in place with strips of masking tap
  • Use pencils or dowels to prop/stabilize the wick.
  • Or use a combination of these methods.

It doesn’t matter the method, as long as the wick stays in the center of the jar. In the above photos, I placed a dab of glue on the bottom of the wick to secure it to the bottom of the jar. I then curled the wick around a small dowel to keep it from tipping over.

Pour the melted beeswax into the jar, leaving one inch of room at the top. Set the jars aside and allow them to cool and set completely.

homemade-beeswax-candles

Trim the wick, light, and enjoy your homemade beeswax candles!

FAQ:

  • Will my beeswax candles go rancid? No. One of the benefits of beeswax is that it will not go rancid like soy wax or palm wax.
  • Can I scent my homemade beeswax candles? Sure! Many people use essentials to create natural aromatherapy candles. However, keep in mind that essential oils don’t love high temps, so often the scent will not be as strong as if you were using artificial fragrances. I usually just leave my homemade candles unscented, and then make my house smell pretty with my essential oil diffuser instead.
  • Wanna make homemade candles using tallow or lard? Click here for my full tallow candle tutorial.
  • How do I filter beeswax for my candles? Here’s a video that’ll show you how!

In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.

4.8 from 5 reviews
How to Make Beeswax Candles
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY
 
Ingredients
  • Beeswax
  • Wicks
  • Glass jars (canning jars work great!)
  • Dedicated container, such as a #10 can, for melting the wax (because it's impossible to clean out afterwards!)
Instructions
  1. (A Note About Amounts: One pound of beeswax equals approximately 20 ounces in volume. For this tutorial, I used one pound of beeswas pastilles. It filled the four small canning jars shown in the above photo. Thankfully, the recipe is very flexible, so if you have more or less beeswax, simply fill more or less containers!)
  2. Place the beeswax into your dedicated container/can. Place the can inside a stock pot filled half-full with water. Simmer over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally as it melts.
  3. In the meantime, prepare your jars and wicks.
  4. The goal is to get the wick to stay in the middle of the jar as we pour in the beeswax and it sets. You can accomplish this a variety of ways.
  5. It doesn't matter the method, as long as the wick stays in the center of the jar. In the above photos, I placed a dab of glue on the bottom of the wick to secure it to the bottom of the jar. I then curled the wick around a small dowel to keep it from tipping over.
  6. Pour the melted beeswax into the jar, leaving one inch of room at the top. Set the jars aside and allow them to cool and set completely.
  7. Trim the wick, light, and enjoy your homemade beeswax candles!

 

Coffee Sugar Scrub Recipe

homemade sugar scrub recipe with chocolate and coffee

By Stacy Karen, contributing writer

Coffee and cocoa are a delightful combination when it comes to a warm beverage. Turns out, it’s a great mix for natural body care, too!

Body scrubs are a fantastic way to remove dead skin cells and brighten skin, giving it a more youthful and vibrant appearance and a softer smoother feel. Body scrubs are also invigorating and enjoyable to apply.

Most body scrubs are made by mixing two parts sugar and one part oil. This creates an excellent and effective sugar scrub, but today I want to share a different method of preparing body scrubs that makes them even more nourishing and unique.

Instead of using oil alone, we will be adding cocoa butter. (Other butters would also work well too, but will have different consistencies due to varying degrees of softness/hardness.)

Cocoa butter is a solid butter, so it needs to be melted prior to mixing with the sugar. This adds a little extra work, but I think you’ll find it worthwhile.

By using cocoa butter in the place of oil, we are creating a body care product that is both exfoliating and extremely moisturizing. Cocoa butter also helps the scrub hold together much better than when using oil alone.

This simple coffee sugar scrub recipe would make a wonderful gift.

If you don’t enjoy the smell of coffee, simply leave it out. The scrub will still be successful and luxurious.

homemade sugar scrub recipe with chocolate and coffee

Coffee Sugar Scrub Recipe

(this post contains affiliate links)

  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 ounces coconut oil (where to buy)
  • 2 ounces avocado oil (where to buy -can be replaced with grapeseed, sweet almond, or sunflower oil)
  • 1.25 ounces cocoa butter (where to buy)
  • 1 tablespoon ground coffee beans
  • Seeds of one vanilla bean (optional) (where to buy)
  • Ice (for cooling cocoa butter after it has melted)

coffee cocoa scrub ingredients

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F. Measure the cocoa butter and coconut oil into an oven proof dish, bowl, or loaf pan and place in the oven. Leave until butter has melted (this will only take a few minutes). Carefully remove from the oven.

Fill a large bowl with ice and place the bowl (or pan) with the melted cocoa butter and coconut oil into the ice. Add the avocado oil and stir to combine. Leave to cool for a few minutes.

oil on ice

Don’t forget to tun off the oven!

Let cocoa butter/coconut oil mixture cool until it is slightly warm, but not hot (about 100 degrees). Be careful not to allow the oil/butter mixture to cool completely as it may harden and it should have a thick liquid consistency when adding the sugar.

Begin adding the sugar a little at a time, stirring until it is thoroughly incorporated.

Add the ground coffee and stir to distribute evenly. Then add the vanilla bean seeds, if using.

One you have incorporated all of the sugar and coffee, your scrub is complete. It will continue to thicken as it sets.

finishing scrub

If you would like to make the sugar scrub have more of a “whipped” texture and appearance, you may use a handheld beater to beat the mixture a few times as the cocoa butter is cooling. You will need to do this reasonable quickly so it does not harden before you have the chance to put it in a jar.

Package in a pretty jar and add a label.

Notes and warnings

  • Please be aware that this homemade sugar scrub is intended for use as a body scrub. It is not to be used as a facial scrub. Scrubs should not be used on windburned, sunburned, or broken skin.
  • This scrub can be made even more “chocolatey” by adding 2 teaspoons of cocoa powder.
  • White sugar may be used in place of brown, but it will have a different scent. You may also use a combination of white and brown sugar, if desired.
  • If you enjoy making scrubs, you might like my ebook, Simple Scrubs to Make and Give; a comprehensive guide to DIY all-natural body scrubs.
  • For other homemade skin care recipes, here are recipes for peppermint citrus sugar scrub, whipped body butter, and silky DIY lotion for hard-working hands.

homemade sugar scrub recipe with chocolate and coffee

Coffee Sugar Scrub Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY Skincare
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 ounces coconut oil
  • 2 ounces avocado oil (-can be replaced with grapeseed, sweet almond, or sunflower oil)
  • 1.25 ounces cocoa butter
  • 1 tablespoon ground coffee beans
  • Seeds of one vanilla bean (optional)
  • Ice (for cooling cocoa butter after it has melted)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees F. Measure the cocoa butter and coconut oil into an oven proof dish, bowl, or loaf pan and place in the oven. Leave until butter has melted (this will only take a few minutes). Carefully remove from the oven.
  2. Fill a large bowl with ice and place the bowl (or pan) with the melted cocoa butter and coconut oil into the ice. Add the avocado oil and stir to combine. Leave to cool for a few minutes.
  3. Don't forget to tun off the oven!
  4. Let cocoa butter/coconut oil mixture cool until it is slightly warm, but not hot (about 100 degrees). Be careful not to allow the oil/butter mixture to cool completely as it may harden and it should have a thick liquid consistency when adding the sugar.
  5. Begin adding the sugar a little at a time, stirring until it is thoroughly incorporated.
  6. Add the ground coffee and stir to distribute evenly. Then add the vanilla bean seeds, if using.
  7. One you have incorporated all of the sugar and coffee, your scrub is complete. It will continue to thicken as it sets.
  8. If you would like to make the sugar scrub have more of a "whipped" texture and appearance, you may use a handheld beater to beat the mixture a few times as the cocoa butter is cooling. You will need to do this reasonable quickly so it does not harden before you have the chance to put it in a jar.
  9. Package in a pretty jar and add a label.

 

 

Stacy Karen - profile 1Stacy is a preacher’s wife and mom to three children. She is slightly obsessed with DIY projects, especially when they involve herbs or natural body care. She blogs at A Delightful Home, where she shares tips on natural, family living and is the author of Simple Scrubs to Make and Give and DIY Face Masks and Scrubs.

 

Whipped Body Butter Recipe

whipped body butter recipe using simple, natural ingredients!

Don’t eat this…

I just wanted to get that out in the open right now because it’s very, verrrry tempting.

OK, well technically you *could* eat this whipped body butter recipe, because the ingredients are perfectly safe, but it’ll taste kinda gross.

The Prairie Kids were circling me like sharks when I made this last week, and were utterly confused when I told them to rub it on their hands instead of licking the beaters… It’s hard having a DIY-crazed mother sometimes…

That being said, your skin will absolutely adore this simple whipped body butter made with natural, nourishing ingredients. It’s decadently moisturizing (without being greasy) and it smells like chocolate–need I say more??

It also makes a completely awesome homemade gift and everyone will think you are a DIY-genius–especially if you package it in a cute lil’ mason jar with a bow. (Just remind them not to eat it!)

whipped body butter recipe using simple, natural ingredients!

(this post contains affiliate links)

Whipped Body Butter Recipe

White Chocolate Body Butter Recipe:

Regular Body Butter Recipe:

(this version doesn’t smell like chocolate)

Instructions for both versions:

Combine all ingredients, except the essential oils, in a small pot or double boiler.

Gently melt and stir over medium-low heat until the mixture is liquid.

Remove from the heat and allow the mixture to partially set up. I’m horribly impatient, so I put mine in the freezer to speed the process. (And then promptly forgot and left it in there way to long… *a-hem*).

Once the mixture is partially set, add the essential oils of your choice, and whip with a hand mixer or stand mixer (my favorite stand mixer) until the body butter is fluffy and stiff peaks have formed.

whipped body butter recipe using simple, natural ingredients!

The body butter in the photo is all ready to go– see how it holds its shape?

Spoon the finished body butter into a cute little jar. Apply as needed to dry skin anywhere on your body, or give it as a gift!

Notes:

  • It’s really important to allow the body butter to set up, otherwise it won’t whip. I’ve found it’s ready to whip when I can stick my finger in the middle and it will hold the indentation. However, if you accidentally forget about your body butter in the fridge or freezer and it gets too hard, all is not lost. Simply allow it to thaw at room temperature until it reaches the proper consistency.
  • You can easily store your whipped body butter at room temperature. However, if your house is very warm, it may melt. But if this happens, you can simply re-whip and you’ll be good to go.
  • Want unscented body butter? No problem! The essential oils are completely optional.
  • My favorite essential oil for this recipe is peppermint–especially peppermint combined with the white chocolate body butter recipe… YUM.
  • Other good essential oil options would be lavender, bergamot, frankincense, geranium, or wild orange. But the sky’s the limit! Here’s how I purchase essential oils for wholesale prices.
  • Need other homemade gift ideas? I’ve got ya covered!

4.7 from 3 reviews
Whipped Body Butter Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: DIY Skincare
 
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup shea butter
  • ¼ cup cocoa butter
  • ¼ cup coconut oil
  • ¼ cup sweet almond oil
  • 10-20 drops of essential oil
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients, except the essential oils, in a small pot or double boiler.
  2. Gently melt and stir over medium-low heat until the mixture is liquid.
  3. Remove from the heat and allow the mixture to partially set up. (you can place in the fridge or freezer to speed this process)
  4. Once the mixture is partially set, add the essential oils of your choice, and whip with a hand mixer or stand mixer until the body butter is fluffy and stiff peaks have formed.
  5. Spoon into a jar and apply anywhere on the body. Or, gift as a gift!

 

whipped body butter recipe using simple, natural ingredients!